List Of Swift Code Of Nepal Banks

List of swift code of Nepal banks :- Would you like to get payments from other countries? And you would prefer not to go to banks or remittance companies to withdraw the amount you got.

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You wish if you can collect payment directly to your bank account without any complications, without going to banks. At that point, indeed, it is conceivable to do as such by utilizing wire transfer with the assistance of SWIFT codes.

International transactions are a lot of significant for Nepalese as many young people fill in as freelancers for international companies, and many need to receive payment directly into bank accounts from companies, for example, Google AdSense, Amazon Kindle, Payoneer, and so forth, where SWIFT code assumes a significant job in facilitating these transactions.

The international online payment gateways, for example, PayPal, Skrill, and so forth are not available for Nepalese and international cards for Nepalese are difficult to obtain. Wire transfer is the only alternative that can be relied on in Nepal.

So let’s understand the SWIFT code, how it works, Nepali Bank’s SWIFT codes to receive payment, and many more things about the SWIFT codes before finding Nepali banks’ SWIFT codes.

What is swift code?

A SWIFT code is an international bank code used to transfer money to banks overseas and recognize individual banks worldwide. This is also referred to as the Bank Identifier Code or Bank Identification Code (BIC). SWIFT Code, in its full form, is the Society for the Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications Code.

SWIFT is a messaging network that communicates between banks and various other financial institutions to send and receive transaction information, such as money transfer instructions, safely, instantly, and accurately.

The SWIFT codes are a combination of various kinds of letters and are unique for each bank. These SWIFT codes are used as Bank Identifier Codes (BIC).

It must be remembered that BIC codes and SWIFT Codes or SWIFT IDs are the same thing and can be used interchangeably. The SWIFT code is almost like a postcode for your bank, ensuring that your money goes to the correct address. It plays a significant role in banking transactions, especially during international transactions.

Swift code of Nepal banks
Swift code of Nepali banks

These codes are used when money is transferred between banks, particularly for international wire transfers or SEPA payments. Banks are now using these codes to exchange messages between themselves. Thus, The SWIFT code’s main purpose is to help the Banks to communicate.  

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However, these codes will make you pay a higher rate, which depends on the ongoing rates at the transaction time. Currently, there are more than forty thousand live SWIFT codes worldwide. Different banks and financial organizations simply give different names for SWIFT codes.

As an organization, SWIFT was established in Brussels in 1973 to develop some common financial transaction processes and standards to make international transactions smoother.

What is the difference between swift codes routing numbers?

SWIFT codes and BICs are the same things, however, do not confuse a bank routing number for a SWIFT code. While these are utilized to identify banks and transfer money internationally, you should utilize a BIC / SWIFT code and an American Bankers Association, or ABA, routing numbers to transfer money domestically.

U.S. banking customers also give their ABA routing numbers, rather than SWIFT codes, when making international transactions. If that occurs, you will have to utilize a third-party transfer agent to manage the money transfer.

There are a few key differences between SWIFT codes and routing numbers:

I) To transfer the money domestically, you utilize a routing number and a SWIFT code to transfer money internationally.

II) A SWIFT code consists of eight to eleven alphanumeric identifiers; the nine-digit routing number.

III) A SWIFT code is also referred to as a BIC; a routing number is also referred to as an ABA number, a routing transit number — RTN — or a routing number for check.

IV) SWIFT codes are used for electronic transfers, such as money transfer, alerts and instructions, and the buying and selling of securities; routing numbers are used for items like paying bills, submitting digital checks, exchanging funds, and making direct deposits.

How many digits is a SWIFT code?

A SWIFT / BIC is an 8-11 character code that identifies the country, city, bank, and branch. Each of the 11 digit codes refers to different offices, whereas the head office or main office refers to 8 digit codes (or those which end in ‘XXX’). SWIFT codes have the following format:

A) Bank code A-Z: The first four characters representing the bank. This typically resembles a simplified version of the name of the bank. It can be

 used only with letters.

B) Country code A-Z: The next two characters, only letters, representing the country in which the bank is located. 

C) Location code 0-9 A-Z: The next 2 characters are made up of letters or numbers. It says where the head office of that bank is.

D) Branch Code 0-9 A-Z: The last three characters of the code can be digits and letters, and are optional. These last three characters in a SWIFT code are used for providing information about the branch code.

So, what might that look like in practice? Imagine this is your bank’s SWIFT code: 

PPPPQQRRXXX

Let’s break that down:

  • PPPP would tell you what bank it is
  • Q.Q. would tell what country that bank is in
  • R.R. would tell you the bank’s location
  • XXX would tell you what branch it is. 

Note:

1) You should remember that not every SWIFT code includes this information.

2) If certain banks do not utilize the last three characters’ branch code, they would have a shorter code with only eight SWIFT characters or BIC code. The branch code can be supplanted by a triple X (i.e., PPPPQQRRXXX) for such banks or left entirely off. A few banks use branch code, so whether utilizing triple X or the standard branch code, SWIFT codes can be of 11 characters.

How Does SWIFT code Work?

With its members, SWIFT uses a standardized communication system, which implies that every message must follow its own rules and regulations. Any message that does not comply is put on hold for review, and most likely discarded. The system’s messaging system is secure as it has the security of a military nature, designed to be unbreachable.

SWIFT assigns a unique code to each member to distinguish the various branches of the different banks. No code is the same for another branch as the program ensures they are distinct from each other.

Apart from these codes, SWIFT certifies its members by strictly verifying their legitimacy to ensure authentic banks make all transactions.

In financial transactions, everything happens within the banks. The sender bank sends a payment order via the SWIFT network, containing all the requisite information about the sender and the recipient. The system would then check the post, guaranteeing that it comes from the bank with credentials for using the program.

After the system verifies the message’s validity, the payment order will then be sent to the recipient bank, where the receiver bank will act on it. As a SWIFT user, the receiver must accept the message as true and act upon it as quickly as possible. The receiver can then clear the funds in the payment order and deposit them to the specified account. 

However, if they find anything wrong with the recipient or with the payment order itself, the receiver bank can keep the payment order.

This is for the banks to settle and check the transaction for themselves, and SWIFT will no longer be involved. SWIFT has already verified the message’s authenticity, stating that the bank has already submitted the payment order. 

That’s only one of the many transfers SWIFT can make. SWIFT also handles payment orders for treasury markets and other public statements, such as from industries and syndications and payment orders to individual and private accounts. 

Regulatory System of Central Bank of Nepal – Nepal Rastra Bank

Suppose a Nabil Bank customer in Dhangadhi wants to send money to his friend, banking at the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, 367 Collins Street, Melbourne, Australia. 

The Dhangadhi customer will walk into his branch of Nabil Bank, Dhangadhi, with the account number of his friend and the special SWIFT code of Commonwealth Bank of Australia for its branch of 367 Collins Street, Melbourne. 

Nepal’s Nabil Bank will send a SWIFT payment transfer message with the help of a stable SWIFT network to the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, 367 Collins Street, Melbourne branch. When the Commonwealth Bank of Australia receives the incoming payment message from SWIFT, it will clear and credit the Australian friend’s account. 

The SWIFT network is just a powerful messaging system, and it is significant to know that SWIFT doesn’t hold any funds or shares, nor does it handle customer accounts. It just lets banks around the world interact in a safe and secure environment. 

The 11 or 8 characters SWIFT code is the standard format standardized by ISO (International Organization for Standardization).

In the above example, we did a breakdown of imaginary SWIFT code; now, we will see the breakdown of a real SWIFT code of Commonwealth Bank Of Australia, 367 Collins Street, Melbourne branch.

Here is the SWIFT code of Commonwealth Bank Of Australia, 367 Collins Street, Melbourne branch: CTBAAU2S3FX.

This SWIFT code is for the branch of “Commonwealth Bank Of Australia” in Australia. And can be broken down to four parts:

CTBA-AU-2S-3FX

The first four characters: These 4 characters (“CTBA”) identify the bank (“Commonwealth Bank of Australia”). These four characters code is used to identify this particular financial institution’s branches and divisions worldwide.

Next Two Characters: These 2 characters are used in identifying the country in which the bank is located. “A.U.” in this example, means the country “Australia.”

Next Two characters: These 2 characters represent a location code (“2S”).

Last three characters: These last 3 characters of SWIFT codes are the branch code (“3FX”), which is used to identify the branch of Commonwealth Bank of Australia. If the branch code is omitted or replaced by triple X (“XXX”), it will denote the head (primary) office of the Commonwealth Bank of Australia.

What is the significance of the Swift Code of Banks?

Any form of money transfer performed by the bank needs a proper Swift Code. The significance of the Swift Code is huge, particularly during online electronic transfer, whereby money is transferred from one bank account to the next.

The entire online money transfer that incorporates the Bank Swift Code is processed through the customer’s Real Time Gross Settlement (RTGS) and National Electronic Fund Transfer (NEFT) system.

It must be noted that this system is only valid in India and does not apply to the international transfer of payments. The main aim behind the Swift Code is to make it easier for bank account holders to know their bank code and how to transfer funds electronically.

Swift bank codes are additionally indispensable for net banking customers who utilize electronic money transfers. A Swift Code incorporates a unique alphanumeric code 8-11, which is used to identify a specific bank.

The unique number is divided into 3 different parts, each of which has its significance. The initial part consists of four characters that denote the bank branch, and the next two characters denote the country code, the next two characters represent lettered place code. The last 3 characters are branch code.

What was The World like Before SWIFT? 

Before SWIFT, Telex was the only way of checking messages necessary for the international transfer of funds. Telex was plagued by low speed, security concerns, and a free message format — that is, Telex didn’t have a standard code system like SWIFT to name banks and identify transactions.

Telex senders needed to identify each transaction in sentences which the receiver then deciphered and implemented. This prompted numerous human mistakes. 

In 1973, the SWIFT system was established to solve these issues. Six significant multinational banks formed a cooperative society to run a global network that would transmit financial messages in a protected and convenient way.

What Goes Through SWIFT?

The program is made even more robust by the fact that at any given time of the cycle, it retains no funds from any banks.

Also, it doesn’t have any outer customer accounts that encourage the transactions that they are dealing with. Or maybe, it just focuses mainly on issuing orders for transfers starting with one bank then onto the next, and that’s it.

With its quick, secure, and modest arrangements, its members grew to over 210 countries with more than 10,000 financial institutions, starting with 15 countries. SWIFT has developed its fame throughout the most recent 40 years connecting this tremendous number of financial institutions.

How can you find the Swift Code for a Bank?

SWIFT, or Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication, codes enable you to transfer payments internationally through the SWIFT network.

If you plan to send or receive money, you will need to find the SWIFT code for the bank to make transfers overseas. There are several ways to do this, including directly contacting the bank or online searching. Easy tactics will direct you to the SWIFT code you are looking for.

Method 1: Recognizing and Using a SWIFT Code

1) Look for a sequence of 8 or 11 characters. A SWIFT code is 8 to 11 numbers and letters that help make money transfers abroad a progressively secure operation.

You can find the SWIFT code on a bank’s website, on its bank statement, or through an online search. You should make sure that you copy down the right characters when documenting a SWIFT code and verify if it has 8 or 11 characters.

• The first 4 characters are for the bank that receives the money. The next 2 represent the country in which the bank is situated in, and the 2 characters that follow indicate the city. The last 3 characters are a particular branch or office, yet they are not constantly included.

2) Send money internationally by using the SWIFT code. In case you are sending money overseas, you will need to figure out the bank’s SWIFT code that will receive the payment. Either ask the person or business to send money to what is the SWIFT code for their bank or see if you can look it up online.

3) Use the SWIFT code to get money on the international level. If you receive money from overseas, make sure you give your bank the SWIFT code to the person or business who will pay you. To get them to give you money, their bank will need the SWIFT code from your bank.

Method 2: Finding a Bank’s SWIFT Code

1) Call the bank, and request the SWIFT code from the employee. Perhaps the best way to figure out the SWIFT code for your bank is to call and inquire. Bank representatives and employees will tell you what the SWIFT code is and the measures you need to take to make a transfer of money.

• If you need to find out a bank’s SWIFT code which is not in the country and may entail an international call, it might be ideal for searching first online.

2) Go to the website of the bank to see if its SWIFT code is mentioned. Regardless of whether you are looking for SWIFT code from your bank or SWIFT code from another bank, go to their website and see if they have listed the code.

• Check the FAQS, foreign transfers, or other related connections on the website of the bank.

• If you have a search feature on the bank website, you can type “SWIFT code” in the search box.

3) Ask the individual or organization you expect to pay for SWIFT code from their bank. On the off chance that it is not the SWIFT code you are searching for from your bank, contact the company or person you will send money to and ask them to give you the SWIFT code from their bank.

• If the person or organization is not sure what the SWIFT code is for their bank, approach them for their bank’s name, and you can find it online.

4) Check your bank statement to find the SWIFT code in your bank. Banks will frequently put their SWIFT code on bank statements. Check one of your recent statements to see whether they list the SWIFT code. On the off chance that you are not receiving paper statements, log on to your online bank account, and view your statement there.

5) Use the SWIFT code Site to search online. Another easy way to locate a bank’s SWIFT code is by searching online. For instance, a few websites, theswiftcodes.com or bankswiftcode.org, help you find the SWIFT code for a bank by choosing your country and then your bank name.

Who Uses SWIFT? 

SWIFT founders initially developed the network primarily to promote correspondence about Treasury and correspondent transactions. The robustness of the message format design has allowed SWIFT to extend its scalability to include the following services slowly:

  • I) Banks
  • II) Brokerage Institutes and Trading Houses
  • III) Securities Dealers
  • IV) Asset Management Companies
  • V) Clearing Houses
  • VI) Depositories
  • VII) Exchanges
  • VIII) Corporate Business Houses
  • IX) Treasury Market Participants and Service Providers
  • X) Foreign Exchange and Money Brokers

What is SWIFT for you?

On the off chance that you need to make international transactions through your local bank, your bank needs to be partnered with SWIFT. At that point, you can be utilized the SWIFT network to communicate securely between banks for a payment order and get your cash starting with one spot then onto the next.

Although, as a consumer, you should be aware of a few things.

I) Correspondent and receiving banks frequently charge fees.

II) If your SWIFT transfer requires 2 currencies, banks regularly apply poor exchange rates, and the difference is pocketed 

III) In certain instances, SWIFT transfers will take up to 5 working days.

IV) If you send money through SWIFT, it very well may be pretty expensive, particularly for smaller sums of money. What’s more, as noted, if your SWIFT transaction needs to go through intermediary banks, everyone will normally be charging its fee.

Even though most banks can provide you with the option to choose whether you, the client, or a combination of both foot the bill for these extra fees, the costs will, in any case, include.

V) Also, if your money needs to be exchanged for another currency, banks can include their spread (profit) to their giving rate. A further cost.

VI) If you are worried about those fees’ INCLUSION, you might consider utilizing an alternative, for instance, TransferWise over your bank for your international money transfers.

The smart new technology from TransferWise avoids those hefty fees by sending your money via a series of local bank transfers across the globe. What’s more, you will get the actual exchange rate — the one you will find on Google — taking the guesswork from ascertaining that additional expense.

VII) TransferWise utilizes the SWIFT network to transfer money to countries worldwide, including South Africa, Japan, and the U.S. dollars. But TransferWise is working to lower those expensive intermediary fees. And make it clear which charges are meant for you. Upfront. There are no surprises, though.

VIII) SWIFT is only one of the organizations and programs which have fundamentally changed global banking. So doing your homework is worth it to ensure you know what you’re getting.

What are the Things to Remember about SWIFT?

I) If you prefer wire transfer to send the payment order using SWIFT globally, at that point, fees are frequently paid by correspondent and recipient banks while utilizing SWIFT for transactions.

II) In some cases, transactions via SWIFT can take up to 5 working days.

III) If you send a smaller amount of money through SWIFT, it can be very expensive at times. What’s more, if your SWIFT transaction has to go through intermediary banks, their fees will usually be paid for each. Because, from most of the banks, you get an option that whether you or the receiver or a combination of both, will pay the bill for these extra fees, the costs will, in any case, add up.

IV) If you choose to exchange your money for another currency, at that point, banks will add their benefit to the rate they give you. A further expense. Or on the other hand, the banks can often adjust their exchange rates so that you can get a smaller price.

V) SWIFT is just one of the organizations and networks successful in forever changing modern banking until the end of time. What’s more, just to make sure you know what you get when making transfers through SWIFT, it is worth thinking about that.

VI) SWIFT does not retain the payment. It just encourages the banks to connect for transactions and services.

What Is the SWIFT Network?

SWIFT is a network that lets multinational banks connect for transactions and other services. Because the world needed a reliable, normal, and universal way of moving money from one country to the next. The SWIFT network provides that system for secure banking communications around the world. 

 SWIFT has established a stable network for 212 different countries’ financial institutions, with more than 10,000 financial institutions associated with SWIFT. The SWIFT network helps financial institutions and banks send and receive financial transaction information in a safe environment. 

There was another system named TELEX before the advent of the SWIFT network, in which banks and financial institutions relied on making money transfers.

The TELEX system was slower, so there was a lack of security for the TELEX system, which was a requirement at a period when technology was making rapid progress. Therefore a reliable SWIFT network became a normal and consistent framework for banks and financial institutions worldwide. 

These are important things to remember about the SWIFT network:

• It does not transfer funds — it enables payments through SWIFT codes between financial institutions. 

 • BICs and International Bank Account Numbers or IBANs standardized by the SWIFT network. 

 Organizations other than financial institutions that use the SWIFT program include 

corporations, security brokers and money traders, clearinghouses and depository organizations 

Are all branches using the same SWIFT code?

I) No, every branch does have a unique code. Every individual from the SWIFT member gets a unique code for identifying every branch of different banks.

Even from the same bank, no codes are similar to other branches, since the system ensures they are distinct from each other. Other from checking bank codes, SWIFT likewise affirms its members only after its credibility has been strictly verified to guarantee that certified banks make all transactions.

II) However, banks with no branches and the head office can utilize 11 characters of SWIFT code instead of 8 characters of SWIFT code.

An example of this is that the head office of Nabil Bank’s SWIFT code is “NIBLNPKT” with 8 characters, and this can be replaced by a triple X (XXX) at the branch code location, which will look like this “NIBLNPKTXXX” with 11 characters these both will denote the head office of the institution.

III) In Nepal, most banks only use SWIFT header code, which is only 8 characters and can be supplanted by 11 SWIFT characters with triple X, and branch code can be utilized instead of triple X. At the point when you utilize the SWIFT head office code, the payment will be sent and credited to your branch account from the head office.

Is it possible to transfer the money without the SWIFT code?

No, you cannot transfer money directly to the receiver’s bank account without the SWIFT code. You need to know the SWIFT code of the receiver’s SWIFT code and the transaction account number even though there are other methods for the transactions constrained to a couple of nations and regions in different countries and not accessible around the world.

Only the SWIFT network is accessible worldwide and supports more than 10,000 financial institutions in 212 different countries. Starting in 2018, around half of all cross-border high-value payments worldwide utilized the SWIFT network for transactions.

Alternatives to the SWIFT system include:

I) Ripple – Crypto firm Ripple Labs sponsor them.

II) INSTEX – The E.U. sponsors them

III) CIPS – China sponsors them

IV) SPFS – Russia sponsors them

But these alternatives are not accessible throughout the world, so it is practically difficult to supplant SWIFT with any other soon. Other options are available, for example, ABA (bank routing number), which is just utilized by U.S. banks. So, the global standard for international transactions is only a SWIFT code.

In any case, if you need you to wish to transfer money directly without a SWIFT code, you can utilize international prepaid cards to transfer funds online. This method does not require the recipient’s account number, and cards can be utilized for payment receipts.

Is the SWIFT code required for a wire transfer?

I) Indeed, SWIFT code is required for international wire transfer, but you can do domestic wire transfer within your own country without a SWIFT code.

II) Many other organizations inside a nation or area facilitate the wire transfer process without utilizing SWIFT codes, such as Clearinghouses, Western Union, other remittance services, etc. In any case, the SWIFT code is required for transactions in most of the wire transfer carried on at an international level involving banks.

What are the Services Offered by SWIFT? 

The SWIFT system provides various services that help both individuals and businesses accurately complete the transactions in a protected, secure, reliable, and seamless environment without making any possible errors. The services the SWIFT offers incorporates:

I) Applications 

SWIFT connections provide access to a range of applications, including real-time instructions matching treasury and forex transactions, banking market infrastructure for handling payment instructions between banks, and securities market infrastructure for handling clearing and settlement guidelines for loans, forex, and derivatives transactions.

II) Business Intelligence 

SWIFT has recently launched dashboards and reporting tools that allow customers to display communications, operation, trade flow, and reporting in a complex, real-time manner. The reports empower sifting dependent on region, country, message types, and associated parameters.

III) Compliance Services 

Compliance programs are focused on activities related to compliance with financial crime. SWIFT also promotes Know Your Consumer (KYC), Regulations, and Anti-Money Laundering (AML) services, etc.

IV) Messaging, Connectivity, and Software Solutions 

The SWIFT business’s essence lies in providing a stable, reliable, and scalable network to transfer messages smoothly. SWIFT offers numerous products and services through its various messaging hubs, applications, and network connections that empower its end-clients to send and receive value-based messages.

Why is SWIFT Dominant?

SWIFT is dominant due to the robustness and reliability it provides to help the financial institutions communicate. In a short timeframe, SWIFT membership grew at a quick rate.

Even though other older and newer services, such as TELEX, Fedwire, Ripple, and CHIPS, SWIFT has continuously held its dominant market position. Its popularity can be recognized as how new message codes have been added to transmit different financial transactions.

Although SWIFT mainly started for basic payment instructions, it currently sends messages for various activities, including security transactions and treasury transactions. About 50 percent of SWIFT traffic is still for payment-based messages, yet now 47 percent is for secure transactions, and the remaining traffic flows to treasury transactions.

How Does SWIFT Make Money? 

SWIFT is a member-owned cooperative society organization. SWIFT members are divided into different groups based on their ownership of the shares. Each SWIFT member has to pay a one-time joining fee and annual support fees that vary by member class. SWIFT also charges users for each post, depending on the form and length of the post.

The charges may also vary according to the volume of use of the bank, as it may vary for banks that use SWIFT for different volumes of messages. Depending on the amount of usage in SWIFT, there are various charging rates for banks.

SWIFT has also launched some additional services powered by the long history of data maintained by SWIFT, which include business intelligence, reference data, and compliance services and offer other income streams for SWIFT.

Do all banks have a SWIFT Code?

The answer is pretty simple: no, they don’t. Numerous smaller banks do not have SWIFT codes – however, this doesn’t imply that they cannot encourage international transactions easily.

Rather they use bigger banks as intermediaries. This ensures that smaller institutions are as yet ready to offer their customers international banking services, even without being part of the SWIFT network.

List Of Swift Code Of Nepal Banks

S.N.NAME OF THE BANK SWIFT CODE         ADDRESSES        CITY
  1.ACE DEVELOPMENT BANK LIMITEDACDENPKAACE BUILDING NAXAL, NARAYAN CHOUR, WARD 1KATHMANDU
  2.AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT BANK LTDADBLNPKARAMSHAHPATHKATHMANDU
  3.BANK OF KATHMANDU LIMITEDBOKLNPKASAURYA SADAN KAMALPOKHARIKATHMANDU
  4.CENTURY COMMERCIAL BANK LIMITEDCCBNNPKACENTURY PUTALISADAKKATHMANDU
  5.CITIZENS BANK INTERNATIONAL LIMITEDCTZNNPKASHARADA SADAN KAMALADIKATHMANDU
  6.CIVIL BANK LIMITEDCIVLNPKACIVIL BANK PLAZA CIBL PLAZA KAMALADIKATHMANDU
  7.EVEREST BANK LTD.EVBLNPKAEBL HOUSE LAZIMPATKATHMANDU
  8.GLOBAL IME BANK LIMITEDGLBBNPKAADARSHA NAGAR – 13BIRGUNJ
  9.GRAND BANK NEPAL LIMITEDDCBNNPKAKATHMANDU PLAZA KAMALADIKATHMANDU
  10.HIMALAYAN BANK LTD.HIMANPKAKARMACHARI SANCHAYA KOSH BUILDING TRADEVI MARG THAMELKATHMANDU
  11.JANATA BANK NEPAL LIMITEDJBNLNPKAGAN BUILDING SANKHAMUL MARG, NEW BANESHWORKATHMANDU
  12.KASTHAMANDAP DEVELOPMENT BANK LTDKDBLNPKATAMRAKAR COMPLEX PAKO, NEWROAD 62/23KATHMANDU
  13.KIST BANK LIMITEDKISTNPKAKIST BUILDING ANAMNAGARKATHMANDU
  14.KUMARI BANK LTDKMBLNPKAGOVINDA BHAWAN PUTALI SADAKKATHMANDU
  15.LAXMI BANK LIMITEDLXBLNPKAKATHMANDUKATHMANDU
  16.LUMBINI BANK LIMITEDLUBLNPKACORPORATE OFFICE DURBARMARGKATHMANDU
  17.MACHHAPUCHCHHRE BANK LIMITEDMBLNNPKARAMSHAH PATHKATHMANDU
  18.MEGA BANK NEPAL LIMITEDMBNLNPKAMEGA MAHAL KANTIPATHKATHMANDU
  19.NABIL BANK LIMITEDNARBNPKANEPAL BANK LIMITED BUILDING NEW ROAD, DHARMA PATHKATHMANDU
  20.NEPAL BANGLADESH BANK LIMITEDNPBBNPKABIJULI BAZAR, NEW BANESWORKATHMANDU
  21.NEPAL BANK LIMITEDNEBLNPKANEPAL BANK LIMITED BUILDING NEW ROAD, DHARMA PATHKATHMANDU
  22.NEPAL BANGLADESH BANK LIMITEDNPBBNPKABIJULI BAZAR, NEW BANESWORKATHMANDU
  23.NEPAL BANK LIMITEDNEBLNPKANEPAL BANK LIMITED BUILDING NEW ROAD, DHARMA PATHKATHMANDU
  24.NEPAL CREDIT AND COMMERCE BANK LTD (NEW ROAD BRANCH)NBOCNPKANRDJOSHI COMPLEX NEW ROADKATHMANDU
  25.NEPAL CREDIT AND COMMERCE BANK LTDNBOCNPKABAGBAZARKATHMANDU
  26.NEPAL INVESTMENT BANK LTD.NIBLNPKTDURBAR MARG 3412KATHMANDU
  27.NEPAL RASTRA BANK (FOREIGN EXCHANGE DEPARTMENT)NRBLNPKAFEDLALITNIWAS BALUWATAR MARGKATHMANDU
  28.NEPAL RASTRA BANKNRBLNPKAKATHMANDU BANKING OFFICE THAPATHALIKATHMANDU
  29.NEPAL SBI BANK LTD. KATHMANDU (BIRGUNJ BRANCH)NSBINPKA001 KATHMANDU
  30.NEPAL SBI BANK LTD. KATHMANDUNSBINPKACORPORATE OFFICE HATTISARKATHMANDU
  31.NIC ASIA BANK LIMITEDNICENPKATRADE TOWER NEPAL THAPATHALIKATHMANDU
  32.NMB BANK LTDNMBBNPKANMB BHAWAN BABARMAHALKATHMANDU
  33.PRIME COMMERCIAL BANK LTDPCBLNPKABIRA COMPLEX NEW ROADKATHMANDU
  34.RASTRIYA BANIJYA BANKRBBANPKAR.B. BANK BUILDING 111 SINGHA DURBAR PLAZAKATHMANDU
  35.SANIMA BANK LIMITEDSNMANPKAALAKAPURI NARAYAN CHAUR NAXALKATHMANDU
  36.SIDDHARTHA BANK LIMITEDSIDDNPKA130/23, TEEN DHARA ROAD, KAMALADIKATHMANDU
  37.STANDARD CHARTERED BANK NEPAL LIMITEDSCBLNPKAGRINDLAYS BHAWAN NAYA BANESHWORKATHMANDU
  38.SUNRISE BANK LIMITEDSRBLNPKAGAIRIDHARA CROSSINGKATHMANDU
  39.TOURISM DEVELOPMENT BANK LTD.TDBLNPKASARASWATI SADAN BHAGAWATI BAHAL ROAD 79/5 THAMEL KATHMANDU METROPOLITAN, 29KATHMANDU

Notes:

• Typically, the Zip code is 44600. Banks also issued various zip codes that will not be approved. 

Find out the zip codes from the General Post Office website for different parts of Nepal. The zip code you are supposed to use should be the bank’s location and not the zip code of your area. 

• The bank name and SWIFT code are usually the only ones required. If the address is needed, use the ones above and not the bank’s address. SWIFT messages transactions are only handled by one branch, which is normally the head office. 

• Double check the SWIFT code and your account number while making SWIFT transactions. 

If you get one of these errors, your transaction won’t go as expected.

Conclusion:

Most SWIFT clients have immense transactional volumes for which manual instruction entry is not functional. The need to automate the creation, processing and transmission of SWIFT messages is increasing. That comes at a cost and overhead of service, though.

Although SWIFT has been fruitful in delivering the same program, it also comes at a cost. For much of its customer base, SWIFT may need to tap into those trouble areas. In this space, automated solutions will offer a new revenue stream for SWIFT and keep customers occupied with it since quite a while ago.

Author : Nilu Nepal

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Jitendra Sahayogee

I am Jitendra Sahayogee, a writer of 12 Nepali literature books, film director of Maithili film & Nepali short movies, photographer, founder of the media house, designer of some websites and writer & editor of some blogs, has expert knowledge & experiences of Nepalese society, culture, tourist places, travels, business, literature, movies, festivals, celebrations.

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