Name of 77 Districts of Nepal With Detail Information

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Here we have posted her name of 77 districts of Nepal. Nepal is a landlocked country. Nepal is divided into 5 development regions, 14 zones and 77 districts in Nepal. Below is the list of 77 zones and their headquarters. Name of 77 districts with their headquarters is enlisted here.

We will publish the state name list of Nepal. See below all names of Nepal ko jilla haru. Nepal ko 77 jilla Haru ko Namawali. There were 77 districts of Nepal. Now there are 2 new districts of Nepal.

Nepal officially the Democratic Federal Republic of Nepal is a landlocked country in South Asia.  It borders the People’s Republic of China in the north and the Republic of India in the south, west and east.

Nepal is divided into 7 provinces and 77 districts under the new Constitution. The only international airport and hub of the country are the Tribhuvan International Airport in the capital Kathmandu.

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Table of Contents

Here is the list of the districts on the basis of their provinces.

nepal's map
S.N. Zone Districts Headquarter
1 Mechi Taplejung Taplejung
2 Panchthar Phidim
3 Ilam Ilam
4 Jhapa Chandragadi
5 Koshi Morang Biratnagar
6 Sunsari Inaruwa
7 Dhankutta Dhankutta
8 Sankhuwasabha Khandbari
9 Bhojpur Bhojpur
10 Terhathum Terhathum
11 Sagarmatha Okhaldunga Okhaldunga
12 Khotang Diktel
13 Solukhumbu Solusalleri
14 Udaypur Gaighat
15 Saptari Rajbiraj
16 Siraha Siraha
17 Janakpur Dhanusa Janakpur
18 Mahottari Jaleswor
19 Sarlahi Malangwa
20 Sindhuli Sindhuligadi
21 Ramechhap Manthali
22 Dolkha Charikot
23 Bagmati Sindhupalchauk Chautara
24 Kavreplanchauk Dhulikhel
25 Lalitpur Lalitpur
26 Bhaktapur Bhaktapur
27 Kathmandu Kathmandu
28 Nuwakot Bidur
29 Rasuwa Dhunche
30 Dhading Dhadingbeshi
31 Narayani Makwanpur Hetauda
32 Rauthat Gaur
33 Bara Kalaiya
34 Parsa Birgunj
35 Chitwan Bharatpur
36 Gandaki Gorkha Gorkha
37 Lamjung Beshisahar
38 Tanahun Damauli
39 Syangja Putalikhel
40 Kaski Pokhara
41 Manag Chame
42 Dhawalagiri Mustang Jomsom
43 Parwat Kusma
44 Myagdi Baini
45 Baglung Baglung
46 Lumbini Gulmi Tamghas
47 Palpa Tansen
48 Nawalpur Tansen
49 Parasi Parasi
50 Rupandehi Bhairawa
51 Arghakhanchi Sandhikarka
52 Kapilvastu Taulihawa
53 Rapti Pyuthan Pyuthan
54 Rolpa Libang
55 Rukum Purba Musikot
56 Rukum Paschim Muskikot
57 Salyan Salyan
58 Dang Ghorahi
59 Bheri Bardiya Gulriya
60 Surkhet Birendranagar
61 Dailekh  
62 Banke Nepalgunj
63 Jajarkot Jajarkot
64 Karnali Dolpa Dunai
65 Humla Simikot
66 Kalikot Manma
67 Mugu Gamgadi
68 Jumla Jumla
69 Seti Bajura Martadi
70 Bajhang Chainpur
71 Achham Mangalsen
72 Doti Silgadi
73 Kailali Dhangadi
74 Mahakali Kanchanpur Mahendranagar
75 Dadeldhura Dadeldhura
76 Baitadi Baitadi
77 Darchula Darchula

Name of 77 Districts of Nepal With Detail Information

Districts of province no. 1, Nepal

  1. Bhojpur:

The district of Bhojpur is one of the six districts that make up the Kosi Zone, in Nepal. Geographically, the district belongs to the hilly area of ​​the Mahabharat Lekh. The main ethnic group present in the district are the Rai. One of the traditional activities of the area is the production of Khukri, the famous Nepalese curved knife, better known as the Gurkha knife.

The best travel time for Bhojpur in Nepal is from January to April and October to December, in which you have a pleasant or warm temperature and hardly to moderate rainfall.

The highest average temperature in Bhojpur is 29 ° C in April and the lowest is 18 ° C in January. Bhojpur district is not only known for its natural beauty but for the plantation of rudraksha as well.

People of bhojpur has now been dedicated in the plantation of Rudraksha to improve their lives and economic status. The famous Salpa Lake which is known for the unification point of the four districts namely Khotang, Solukhumbhu, bhojpur, and Sankhuwasabha is situated at Dobhane of bhojpur.

From this place, mountains, hills, fountains and other natural scenes of Solukhumbhu, Sankhuwasabha, Bhojpur and Khotang districts can be observed.

  1. Dhankuta:

Dhankuta is one of the 77 districts of Nepal. It is part of the Kosi zone, which, in turn, is part of the country’s eastern region. It borders Bhojpur (in the north-west), Sankhuwasabha (in the north), Terhathum (in the north-east), Morang and Sunsari (in the south), Panchthar of the Mechi area (in the east) and the Udaipur region of Sagarmatha  (in the West).

The height of the district is from 300 to 2500 m above sea level. Most of the population is engaged in agriculture, the main crops of which are corn, rice, and millet. As well as citrus fruits, cauliflower, cabbage, ginger and, in recent years, increased tea.

A well-preserved forest expands along a ridgeline on the northwest side of Dhankuta with rhododendron and pine trees. The largest ethnic groups in the district are the Chhetri, the Tamang, the Limbu, the Rai, and the Brahmins and the Magar. Through the district, the Koshi Rajmarg highway runs north-south.

  1. Ilam:

The district of Ilam is one of 77 districts in Nepal and belongs since the constitution of 2015 to the province No. 1. It has an area of ​​1703 km ². The district is located approximately 600 kilometers east of the Nepalese capital Kathmandu and borders the Nepalese districts Jhapa, Panchthar, and Morang as well as the West Bengal district Darjiling.

Ilam stretches from the fertile Terai plain to the hilly foothills of the Himalayas. The highest point of the district is about 3000 m above sea level.  The region is often visited by naturalists because of its rare species of birds and because of the local small pandas. The name Ilam comes from the Limbu and means “winding road”.

Ilam is one of the most economically advanced regions in Nepal.  The tea is grown there is also exported to Europe as Ilam Tea.  In addition to tea, cardamom, ginger, and potatoes are grown in the district and milk is produced.  In religious terms, the Devi Temple has special importance as a place of pilgrimage.

A tourist attraction is the May Pokhari Lake, which is considered the “residence of the goddess”. During the Civil War from 1994 to 2006, Ilam was frequently in the media as the Maoists, who led a peasant uprising against the monarchy, were active in the region.

  1. Jhapa:

The District Jhapa is one of 77 districts in Nepal and belongs since the constitution of 2015 to the province No. 1. The 1606 km ² district is located directly on the Indian border. It’s district neighbors are Ilam in the north, Morang in the west, the western state of West Bengal in the east, and the Indian state of Bihar in the south.

Jhapa is the easternmost district of Nepal and lies in the fertile Terai lowlands. The northern part has smaller mountains, the southern part of agricultural areas and dense forests. In Jhapa, especially during the monsoon season in the summer 250 to 300 cm of precipitation occur annually.

The hilly north receives more precipitation than the south. Jhapa is home to numerous indigenous ethnic nationalities such as the Rajbanshi, Satar, Meche, Koche, Limbu, Dhimal and Gangain. Other multiple ethnic groups such as Rai, Dhangad, Tamang, Uraon, Magar, Gurung and many others came to the district in the late 19th century.

Rajbanshi is the most widely spoken language in this region. Jhapa is one of the most developed areas of Nepal. Almost all villages and towns are connected by roads. There are schools and colleges in many parts of the district. The district also has an airport and a hospital in Bhadrapur.

Because of its alluvial nature, the district is well suited for agriculture, Jhapa is the largest producer of rice and is therefore called the “Granary of Nepal”.  In addition to grains such as rice and wheat, Jhapa is also one of the largest producers of jute, tea, betel nut, gum, and other crops.

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Jhapa plays an important role in national politics. The Communist Revolution of Nepal was launched in this district, which led to the formation of Nepal’s most prominent national party, the CPN-UML. Many national political figures are from Jhapa. Likewise, the district played a significant role in the fight against the monarchy.

  1. Khotang:

Khotang District is also one of the districts of province no. 1. The rivers Dudh Koshi and Sunkoshi form the western and southern district border.  The district of Khotang is one of the six districts that confirm the Zone of Sagarmatha, in Nepal.

It borders on the Okhaldhunga region (in the west), the Udayapur region (in the south), the Solukhumbu region (in the north) and the Bhojpur region of the Kosi zone (in the east).  The area of ​​the district is 1591 km².

The major lakes of khotang are Barahpokhari, Chhita pokhari and Indrenipokhari. Major markets of this district are Diktel Bazar, Halesi, Arkhoule Market, Ainselukharka, Baxila Mane bhanjyang, Syalgaude, Chisapani, Simpani, Pancjar dobato, Khotang Bazaar Panchmi Market.

This district is considered as a vital place for those who love nature. It is also important for religious tourism. As part of the district is mountainous area, cold weather is found in Khotang. There is no high mountain area in this district, but Khotang district is about 152 meters to 3620 meters from the surface of the sea.

  1. Morang:

The district is named after the Limbu king Mawrong Mung Hang, who founded the kingdom of Morang at the beginning of the 7th century. It is situated between the rivers Koshi and Mechi.

The capital and fortress were in Rongli, today’s Rangeli.  In 849 King Uba Morang incorporated his empire Limbuwan.  From 1584 Morang was ruled by Limbu king Sangla Ing of Varatappa (east of today’s Bijayapur at Dharan).

The Ing Dynasty was followed by the Sen and Khebang dynasties until 1774, when Gorkha king Prithvi Narayan Shah, the founder of Nepal defeated Limbuwan.  The last king of Morang was Buddhi Karna Raya Khebang. The 1855 km² district is located in the southeast of Nepal in the Terai on the Indian border.

District neighbors are Sunsari, Jhapa, and Dhankuta. The administrative center Biratnagar is the fourth largest city in Nepal;  other important places are Urlabari, Biratchowk, and Rangeli. Until the middle of the last century, there were still extensive jungles.

Small remnants of it are still found at the foot of the Himalayas. Today the district is predominantly agricultural with the cultivation of rice and jute.  Nevertheless, Morang has the highest industry density in the country. In Morang live different ethnicities like the Rajbanshi, Satar, Meche, Koche, Limbu, Dhimal and Gangain.

Other ethnic groups such as Rai, Dhangad, Tamang, Uraon, Magar, Gurung and many others came to the district in the late 19th century. After Nepali, Limbu and Maithili are the most common languages. Morang is one of the most developed districts of Nepal. The district is relatively well developed by roads.  In Biratnagar, there is an airport.

  1. Okhaldhunga:

Okhaldhunga is another beautiful district of province no. 1. The rivers Likhu Khola, Sunkoshi and Dudh Kosi from the western, southern and eastern district border. The river Maulung Khola flows through the central part of the district.

It borders on Solukhumbu (in the north), Khotang (in the east), Udayapur (in the south) and Ramechhap and Sindhuli regions of Janakpur (in the west and south-west).  The area of ​​the district is 1074 km². From the area, Okhaldhunga, which is located east of Kathmandu, come the experts for building houses made of natural stones.

Many men specialize in stone knocking. Accurate and precise, the stones are hand-made into rectangular shapes. It almost looks like the stones are being machined. In this literary fertile land, known as the birth land of Yugakavi Siddhi Charan Shrestha, the kingdom was known to be ruled by Gopal and Kirant dynasty.

The ethnic variation found in the district is Sunuwar, Rai, Limbu, Gurung, Tamang, Sherpa, Gharti, Bhujel, Newar, Chhetri, Bahun, Kami (Vishakarma), Damai (Parar), Thapa, etc. Sunuwar (coach), Rai, Gurung, Sherpa, Tamang, etc. Are the main languages that are used by the local people.

  1. Panchthar:

This beautiful district has an area of ​​1606 km ². In the east, the Singalila ridge forms the border with India. The northwestern district boundary is the Tamor River.

The district neighbors are in the north Taplejung and in the west Dhankuta and Terhathum.  In the south Panchthar borders on Morang and Ilam and in the east on the Indian states of Sikkim and West Bengal. Diversity of weather can never found in the district.

Normally, in the summer the district with its panoramic view can be enjoyed. However, in the winter the weather is extremely cold. The annual rainfall in the district is  2,071 mm, and the maximum temperature is 26.1 degrees Celsius and the minimum temperature is up to 12.3 degrees Celsius.

  1. Sankhuwasabha:

One of the beautiful districts of province 1 is Sankhuwasabha which is characterized by the deep valley of the Arun, one of the three major rivers of Nepal, which is attributed to a high hydropower potential.

In the district living indigenous peoples are the Yakkhas, Lohorung, Kulung, Rai, Gurung, and Limbu. The district of Sankhuwasabha is one of the six districts that make up the Koshi Zone, in Nepal.

In 2001, the life expectancy of the inhabitants of the district was 63.8 years, with a hospital and five doctors in the district in 2002. It is located in the eastern district of Taplejung and Terhathum, Solukhumbu in the west and the district of Bhojpur, Tibet of China in the north and Terhathum in the south and the Panchkota district.

The world’s fifth highest mountain, Makalu, is at the height of 8481 meters and the world’s lowest valley Arun which is 457 m from the sea level, both nature’s amazing diversity can be found in this district. Agriculture is the main profession of the inhabitants.

The district has been the focal point for the tourists who are seeking thrill in nature. And also for religious tourism, the district has been proved to be very important.

  1. Solukhumbhu:

This district consists of the regions around Mount Everest: Solu and Khumbu.  The river valley of Likhu Khola forms the western boundary of the district.  To the east of the district runs the Honku Drangka valley.  Most of the district is drained by Dudhkoshi. Mount Everest (Sagarmatha) is located in the north of the district in Sagarmatha National Park.

The park is protected as a World Heritage Site. The district of Solukhumbu is one of the six districts that make up the Sagarmatha area, in Nepal.  The district consists of two regions joined by the Sun Koshi River: the Khumbu region (with an altitude of 3,700 to 4,300 m and the Solu region.)

In this district, the Sherpa ethnic group lives. Namche Bazaar is a village in the district of Solukhumbu in the Sagarmatha National Park to the northeast of the capital of Nepal. Namche Bazaar is located within the Khumbu and scattered along the sides of a horseshoe-shaped hill at an altitude of 3440 meters at its lowest point.

Namche is the main trading center for the Khumbu region with several Nepalese government offices, a police station, and two banking agencies. Immediately west of Namche is the Ri Kongde with 6,187 meters and to the east, there is Mount Thamserku with 6,623 meters. Sagarmatha National Park Visitor Center, located at the upper end of the village (right side when looking upwards).

Provides information on the region’s wildlife.  Sherpa Museum, located above the village. An introduction to the Sherpa culture and the region’s fauna and flora. Namche Monastery, located on the left side of the village, when looking up. A small monastery in the Nyingma tradition of Tibetan Buddhism.  It has a nice patio and some traditional frescoes on the wall of the main shrine.

Namche Bazaar is popular among trekkers in the Khumbu region, especially for adaptation to altitude, and is the gateway to the highest part of the Himalayas.  Hundreds of trekkers come every day to the village from the tracks that lead to Lukla, Dingboche, Gokyo, or Everest Base Camp.

The district has a number of lodges and shops to cater to the needs of visitors, as well as a number of Internet cafes, making it one of the few places in the district where trekkers can access the internet.

On Saturday mornings, a weekly Bazaar is held in the center of the village, there is also a daily Tibetan market where cheap Chinese clothes, handicrafts, and consumer goods are the main items for sale.

  1. Sunsari:

Sunsari is located in the southeast of Nepal.  The district extends over the Himalayan plain, the Terai, to the Indian border.  The river Koshi forms the western district border.

The district administration is located in the city of Inaruwa. The Sunsari district is one of the six districts that make up the Koshi Zone, in Nepal. Geographically, the district belongs to the flat area of ​​the Terai.  The western boundary of the district is marked by the Sapta Koshi river, a tributary of the Ganges, which in its southern part forms the Koshi Tappu Nature Reserve.

The main ethnic group present in the district are the Tharus. It is bordered by the Udayapur and Saptari districts of the Sagarmatha zone (in the west), the Dhankuta region (in the north), the Morang region (in the east) and the Indian state of Bihar (in the south).

Until 1962, Sunsari was part of the Morang district, however, after the reform of the administrative-territorial division, it became a separate district.

  1. Taplejung:

The district Taplejung is one of 77 districts in Nepal and belongs since the constitution of 2015 to the province No. 1. Its main town is the city of Taplejung. The 3646 km ² district is the northeasternmost Nepalese district and is located directly on the Indian and Chinese border in the Himalayas.

It’s district neighbors are in the west Sankhuwasabha, in the south Terhathum and Panchthar. Taplejung is bordered to the east by the Indian state of Sikkim and to the north by the Tibet Autonomous Region. The highest point of the district is the 8586 m high Kanchenjunga, the third highest mountain in the world.

The average temperature is 11.3 ° C, the minimum temperature is 0 ° C and the maximum temperature is 30 ° C.  The average rainfall is 1440 mm per year.  The following ethnic groups live in the district: Limbus, Tibetans, Sherpas, Rai, Gurung, Magar, Newar, Sunuwar.

Cardamom farming, agriculture, animal husbandry, and tourism are the major occupation for the people here. The Sherpa people, who had the history of arriving from Tibet more than four hundred years ago, live at higher altitudes.

The Sherpas of this region have certain distinguishing culture and tradition – quite different from the Sherpas who live in the Solukhumbu district in the Sagarmatha region. Alpine grasslands, rocky outcrops, dense temperate, green forests, and low river valleys make up the beauty of the district. Nearly located is the Tinjure Milke Jaljale ridge that forms a border between Taplejung, Tehrathum and Sankhuwasabha districts.

This is an area popularly known for its bio-diversity including the world’s largest natural rhododendron forest with the highest number of rhododendron species in the world. The rich cultural heritage of Taplejung can be viewed in the Buddhist gumbas (monasteries).

Such as the 400-year old Diki Chhyoling Gumba of Olangchungola which has a large statue of Avalokiteshwara. A lamp or diyo of ghiu (Nepali butter) at the altar has been burning here continuously since the construction of the gumba. The waters of a small stream outside the gumba uninterruptedly spin twelve prayer wheels with the prayer “Om Mane Pembe Hum” inscribed on them.

  1. Terhathum:

The second last district of province no. 1 is as beautiful and rich in history. The river Tamor forms the eastern and southern district border. The name means “Thirteen castles” that are said to have existed in the area of ​​Limbu, the people residing in the district.

Black Cardamom is an important crop in Terhathum. It is a district in the Koshi area of ​​Nepal.  It borders on Dhankuta (in the south-west), Sankhuvasabha (in the north-west), Taplejung (in the northeast) and Panchthar (in the south-east).

Although, geographically the district is remote it still is the hilly area that is first connected with road. People here are more focused on cash vegetation such as tea, orange, citrus, pepper, milk and muli herbal plantation such as amriso.

The major tourist attracting places of the district are Teenjure mountain, hryatung fountain, Pattek hill, basantapur. Of the 32 species found in Nepal, in Tehrathum which is known as the capital of Nepal’s Gurans, 28 species of rhododendron are found.

The main tourist attractions include the hiking, the delightful view of Makalu and Kanchenjunga Himalayas, the paragliding from Teenjure mountain, the sunrise and the sunset from the Mountains of Menchhyam.

  1. Udayapur:

The District Udayapur is one of 77 districts in Nepal and belongs since the constitution of 2015 to the province No. 1. The district was part of Sagarmatha County until 2015. The district forms an 80 km long west-east direction and 20 km wide strip in the southern Himalayas.

It extends from the Mahabharat chain in the north over the Inner Terai to the Siwaliks in the south.  The Koshi forms the eastern border, the Sunkoshi the northern border of the district.  In the west, the Kamala runs a short distance along the district border.

Geographically, the district belongs to the hilly area of ​​the Mahabharat Lekh. The main ethnic group present in the district are the Chhetri. The country’s largest cement industry, “Udaipur Cement Industry”, is located in this district, adding that it has helped to introduce this district.

The country’s largest cement industry, “Udaipur Cement Industry”, is located in this district, it has helped to introduce this district. The maximum temperature for this district is 38 degrees Celsius and the minimum temperature is 16 degrees Celsius.

There is no good system in the health sector in this district. Healthcare centers are void of doctors, healthcare workers, and equipment. From the geographical perspective, this district, which has covered hill and Terai areas, has been behind physical infrastructure and development.

Because of lack of physical facilities such as geographical disadvantages, inconvenience of traffic, lack of physical facilities such as library laboratory in educational institutions, lack of qualified subject teachers. Due to the lack of opportunity to choose a good subject, students of this district are forced to go to Biratnagar, Dharan, Rajviraj, Janakpur.

Districts of province no. 2, Nepal

  1. Saptari:

The district of Saptari is one of 77 districts in Nepal and belongs since the constitution of 2015 to the province No. 2. Until 2015, the district belonged to the Sagarmatha administrative district. The district is located in the Terai and extends from the first Siwalikkette in the north to the Indian border in the south.

The rivers Balan and Koshi, one of the three largest rivers in Nepal, delimit the district to the west and east. The weather is tropical with hot and very humid summers (temperatures between 33 ° C and 26 ° C, humidity about 85%) and mild winters (temperatures between 25 ° C and 11 ° C, humidity about 40%).

The monsoon starts in May and lasts until October. Geographically, the district belongs to the flat area of ​​the Terai. The main ethnic group present in the district are the Yadavs. It borders on the Siraha district (in the west), the Udayapur region (in the north), the Sunsari district of the Kosi zone (in the east) and the Indian state of Bihar (in the south).

The area of ​​the district is 1363 km². According to the 2011 census, the population is 639,284, of which 313,846 are men and 325,438 are women. According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 570,282 people.  85.73% of the population is Hindu religion;  10.57% is Islam;  5.54% is Buddhism. Saptari is a district that has a unique identity in Nepal.

At some time it is considered as an important part of the Tirhut state, a residential area of ​​different ethnic groups in this district. The district is known as the treasury of Nepal, the river Saptakoshi in the east and the Balan river flown in the west.

These rivers have increased the integrity of Mithilanchal and have also set the boundaries of the district. The possibility of internal and external tourism seems fair enough in this district, which has played an important role in every political change in Nepal.

  1. Parsa:

Parsa lies with its capital Birgunj in the administrative area Narayani.  A large part of the district in the north belongs to Chitwan National Park. It is part of the Narayani zone, which, in turn, is part of the Central region of the country.

It borders on Chitwan (in the north-west), Makwanpur (in the north), Bara (in the east) and Bihar (in the south and south-west) of India.  The area of ​​the district is 1353 km². The population according to the 2011 census is 601,017 people, of which 312,358 men and 288,659 women.

According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 497,219. 83.10% of the population profess Hinduism;  14.48% is Islam;  1.68% – Buddhism. Geographically, the district belongs to the flat area of ​​the Terai.

The major monuments of this district with which it has established it’s unique identity are Bindhyabasini, Mahuwanmat (Parsanath Mahadev Temple), Ramjhanki, Katti Math, Radhakrishna Temple, Bhiswa Archaeological site and Parsagadhi. The historians say the name of Parsa has been named after the name of the monastery of Parasnath, which is located in the Mahuwan village of the district.

  1. Sarlahi:

It is part of the Janakpur zone, which, in turn, is part of the Central region of the country. It borders Sindhuli (in the north), the Mahottari region (in the east), the Rautahat region of the Narayani zone (in the west) and the Indian state of Bihar (in the south).

The area of ​​the district is 1259 km². The territory of Sarlahi can be divided into 3 physiographic regions: the Sivalik Range (Churia), Bhanvar and Terai.  The Shivalik ridge occupies the extreme north of the region, its average height is about 900 m above sea level.

To the south, between the Sivalik Ridge and the Terai Rivers, is the Bhanvar region, which is 150–300 m above sea level. In the southern half of the region (from the central part and to the border with India) is the flat region of Terai, which is almost completely occupied by agricultural land and is characterized by a very large population density.

Part of the western boundary of the district forms the large river Bagmati. Geographically, the district belongs to the flat area of ​​the Terai.  The western border is marked by the Bagmati river. The main ethnic group present in the district are the Yadavs.

It is believed that the name of the district comes from the temple of Sarlahi Devi situated in the hempur of the district. The locals believe that any person who goes to the temple at night carrying the lamp would die. Therefore, the nearby areas of the temple are still not habituated.

  1. Bara:

It is part of the Narayani zone, which, in turn, is part of the Central region of the country. The administrative center is the city of Kalaiya. It borders on Parsa (in the west), Makwanpur (in the north), Rautakhat (in the east) and the Indian state of Bihar (in the south).

The area of ​​the district is 1190 km². Geographically, the district belongs to the flat area of ​​the Terai. The main ethnic group present in the district are the Muslims. Bara District is located on the border of the central development region of Nepal.

Out of a total population of the district, only 4.2% of people are economically active. Out of this, only 25.4% of women are economically active. The per capita income of families in the neighborhood is almost Rs.  5242 only. Upon evaluation of this data, the district of Bara is the economically backward district of our country.

Most of the family belongs to the marginalized Dalit group and Janjati.  Few people in the community have a lot of land and people without land have to work in the field of landlords on days of Rs 50 per day or 4 kg of rice or wheat per day.

As for the record, the per capita income of the families of these communities seems to be less than Rs 5242. While the average number of components in each family is about 6 -7.  The poor, Dalits and Janjati have a maximum number of members in their home to be 10 to 12. But as for the source of income that is found much less than not enough to feed, educate and provide an adequate shed for them.

The hygienic-sanitary condition of families is also poor. The community’s local economy is driven by agriculture for those who have their land. But remaining with less land is driving their economy from daily work to other cultivated land.   In order to reduce poverty, Jan Jagaran Youth Club, on behalf of the Poverty Reduction Fund, is implementing the poverty alleviation program in the Bara district.

The general objective of the program is to organize and empower the Dalits, Janjates, women and marginalized groups for poverty reduction.

  1. Siraha:

The district of Siraha is one of the six districts that make up the Sagarmatha Zone, in Nepal. It borders on the Udayapur region (in the north), the Saptari region (in the east), the Dhanus region of the Janakpur zone (in the west) and the Indian state of Bihar (in the south).

The area of ​​the district is 1188 km². The district of Siraha is one of 77 districts in Nepal and belongs since the constitution of 2015 to the province No. 2. Siraha lies in the Terai and stretches 30 km from the first Siwalikkette in the north to the Indian border in the south.

The two rivers Kamala and Balan border the district to the west and east. The district had 572,399 inhabitants in 2001;  In 2011 there were 637,328. In 2014, Siraha was one of the 15 poorest districts in Nepal, with just over 0.4 of the Human Development Index. The literacy rate was just under 40% in the same year. Kamla, Ghurmi, Balan, Mainavati, Khutti, Ghagan, Surray, Sahaja, Bataha, Ziwa are some lakes found in the district.

  1. Dhanusha:

The district of Dhanusha is one of 77 districts in Nepal and belongs to the province No. 2 since the constitution of 2015. By 2015, Dhanusha belonged to the administrative zone Janakpur, which in turn belonged to the development region center.

The first President of the Republic of Nepal Ram Baran Yadav is the origin from the district. Dhanusha is located in the south of the country (Terai) on the border with India. The district capital is Janakpur. According to the census, the district had 671,364 inhabitants in 2001, in 2011 it was 754,777 of which 378,538 are men and 376,239 are women.

Most of the population speak Maithili.  89.35% of the population profess Hinduism;  8.36% is Islam;  1.49% – Buddhism. Dhanusha is one of the most important Hindu pilgrimage destinations in Nepal for Hindus as it is the birthplace of Janakpurdham Sita.  Sita was the daughter of King Janak and married the son of Ram Chandra of King Dasharath of Ayodhya.

The former palace of King Janak is today a temple. Next to it is a temple where Ram is said to have married Sita, and to this day every year, a festival called Bibaha Panchami is celebrated on the occasion of the wedding of Ram and Sita. The temple is decorated as if for a real wedding.

It borders on the Mahottari region (in the west), the Sindhuli region (in the north), the Sirah region of the Sagarmatha zone (in the east) and the Indian state of Bihar (in the south).  The area of ​​the district is 1180 km².

  1. Rautahat:

Rautahat is part of the Narayani zone, which, in turn, is part of the Central region of the country. It borders on the Bar area (in the west), the Makvanpur area (in the north), the Sarlahi area of ​​the Janakpur zone (in the east) and the Indian state of Bihar (in the south).

The area of ​​the district is 1126 km². The population according to the 2011 census is 686,722 people, including 351,079 men and 335,643 women. According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 545,132 people.  77.77% of the population are Hindu religion;  19.70% is Islam;  1.85% is Buddhism;  0.15% – Christianity.

Thus, Rautakhat is the region with the highest Muslim population in Nepal. Rautahat is the district in the central Terai of Nepal.  This district has a diverse economic, social and cultural specialty with great potential. The name of Rautahat district consisting of two words named Raut and Hat are the native inhabitants of Terai.

The meaning of Raut refers to the significance of Yadav (Gawla) and the meaning of the Hatt word is the market. Thus, the words of Rautahat mean that it is the place of Yadav.

  1. Mahottari:

Mahottari is part of the Janakpur zone, which, in turn, is part of the Central region of the country.  The administrative center is the city of Jaleshvar. It borders Sarlahi (in the west), Sindhuli (in the north), Dhanus (in the east) and the Indian state of Bihar (in the south).

The area of ​​the district is 1002 km². The population according to the 2011 census is 627,580 people, including 311,016 men and 316,564 women.  According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 553,481. 84.24% of the population are Hindu religion;  13.34% is Islam;  2.02% Buddhism;  0.14% – Christianity.

It is located in the Janakpur Zone of the Central Nepal region.  It has occupied ​​a 0.68% area of ​​the total area of ​​Nepal. There is a lot of Hindu and Muslim reside in the district. It has more or less 92 ethnic variations. The main source of livelihoods in this district is agriculture profession.

This district is considered as a backward area in the national environment because the development opportunities and possibilities of farming cannot be utilized. Although there’s the availability of agricultural land, electricity, accessible geographical condition, forest, rivers, and open Indian border.

The maximum temperature here is more than 42-degree Celsius so sometimes people here suffer from various diseases. However, the temperature decrease in the northern part of the district.  Similarly, the minimum temperature reaches to 5 degree Celsius in winter.

Districts of province no. 3, Nepal

  1. Bhaktapur:

The Bhaktapur district is the smallest district in the Bagmati administration of Nepal. It has an area of ​​119 km ² and 304,651 inhabitants (2011). The place of interest to see in Bhaktapur district are Surya Vinayak.

It is located at a distance of just 2 kilometers south of the city of Bhaktapur, so it is very easy to walk.  It is the only sanctuary dedicated to the god Ganesh. This temple is surrounded by an environment flanked by many attractive landscapes and is one of the most popular pilgrimage sites in Nepal.  Due to its location, this sanctuary offers spectacular sunrises.

From this place, you can see Bhaktapur, as well as the snowy peaks of the Himalayas, and getting to this place is simple thanks to stairs that save the steepest spaces. The god Ganesh is under a white shikhara and in front of the image, there is a rat.  The rat is considered as the vehicle of God.

Five minutes walk from the sanctuary you can reach the sanctuary of the goddess Parvati, the mother of Ganesh. The followers of the god Ganesh believe that by visiting this sanctuary they will get the blessings of God.  Since the Surya Vinayak shrine was built in Bhaktapur, devotees have flocked to the site.

And it is customary for parents to pray to this god when their children have trouble learning to speak. And people who start a business or a new project come to get the blessing of this god. Changu Narayan is located 4 kilometers north of Bhaktapur and about 22 kilometers from Kathmandu.  It is the most ancient temple in the Kathmandu Valley.

This temple appears in the list of World Heritage monuments since and is a very picturesque place at an altitude of 1700 meters.  The most authentic inscription located in the Changu Narayan compound dates back to the year 464. This temple located on top of a hill north of Bhaktapur is the oldest pagoda temple that exists in Nepal.

The temple was dedicated to the god Vishnu by King Lichhavi in ​​the 5th century. Thimi is a town famous for its works in ceramics, especially in the art of making colorful masks of different deities, demons, and animals.  In addition, Thimi produces much of the fresh vegetables for the Kathmandu valley.

Nagarkot is located on a hill at an altitude of 2,195 meters northeast of Bhaktapur and at a distance of about 18 kilometers. This place is famous for its panoramic views of the mountains, as well as for its sunsets and sunrises when the sky is clear. The Kailashnath Mahadev statue, which is 43.58 meters high, is located in the town of Sanga, in the district of Bhaktapur and about 20 kilometers east of Kathmandu.

This stature is considered to be the tallest statue of the god Shiva in the world. The construction of the statue began in 2004 and was completely finished in 2011. The statue is made of bronze, cement, steel, and zinc.  It is located on a hill near where the population lives, which was not very agreed with the construction of the stature.

But with its completion and with the arrival of tourists has seen that their community has prospered and has developed significantly. In any case, certain discrepancies have arisen because the statue is on government land. And the committee that manages it has imposed a visitor entry fee and a quota of worship to the devotees.

One of the most important challenges in the construction of this statue was to ensure that there were no landslides on the mountain.  Most of the workers were from India, as there were few experienced workers in Nepal.

  1. Chitwan:

Chitwan lies with its capital Bharatpur in the administrative area of Narayani in the interior Terai near the Indian border. The river Narayani forms the western district border.

Much of the district in the south is occupied by Chitwan National Park. It is part of the Narayani zone, which, in turn, is part of the Central region of the country.  The administrative center is the city of Bharatpur.

It borders on the Makwanpur district (in the east), the Parsa district (in the south-east), the Navalparasi region of the Lumbini zone (in the west), the Gorkha and Tanahu regions of the Gandaki region (in the north), the Dhading region of the Bagmati zone (in the north-east) and the Indian state of Bihar (in the south). The area of ​​the district is 2218 km².

The district is named after the Chitwan Valley in the Inner Terai, within which it is located. The population according to the 2011 census is 579,984 people, including 279,087 men and 300,897 women.

According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 472,048 people. 81.40% of the population profess Hinduism; 13.02% – Buddhism; 3.39% – Christianity; 1.16% is Islam. The region’s economy is based on agriculture, the main crops of which are: rice, corn, wheat, legumes, mustard, and vegetables. Poultry farming is developed.

The district is the largest producer of corn in Nepal, with an approximate cultivation area of ​​27,170 hectares in 2004. Chitwan is recognized for its production of mustard oil.

  1. Dhading:

Dhading is located in the administrative zone of Bagmati. At the 2001 census Dhading had 338,658 inhabitants;  In 2011 it was 336,067. The district is characterized by the massif of Ganesh Himal.

The population is mainly Brahmin and Chhetri in the south and Tamang and Gurung in the north;  in the middle area also live many Newari. It is part of the Bagmati zone, which, in turn, is part of the central region of the country.  The administrative center is the city of Dhading-Besi.

It borders on Rasuwa district (in the northeast), Nuwakot region (in the east), Kathmandu district (in the southeast), Makwanpur and Chitwan districts of the Narayani zone (in the south), Gorkha district of the Gandaki zone (in the west) and the Tibet Autonomous Region  PRC (in the far north). The area of ​​the district is 1926 km².

The main rivers are the Trisuli and Budhi-Gandaki. Geographically, the district belongs to the hilly area of ​​the Mahabharat Lekh. Although in the northern area of ​​the territory there is the Ganesh Himal group that with the peak of the Ganesh NW (or Ganesh II, or sometimes Ganesh III) reaches 7110 m.

At the time of the earthquake, 825 families lived in Jharlang and all of them lost their homes, as well as warehouses with food and farm animals (their only resources).

  1. Dolakha:

Dolakha is located east of Kathmandu in the administrative zone Janakpur. At the 2001 census, it had 204,229 inhabitants;  In 2011 it was 186,557. In the northeast of the district is the famous Himalayan summit of Gaurishankar.

Geographically, the district belongs to the Himalayan mountainous area of ​​Parbat. The main ethnic group present in the district are the Chhetri. The district is located in the Janakpur zone and the capital is Bhimeswar (or: Bhimeshwor), formerly called Charikot.

From ancient times, its unique economic, social, religious, and political identity is found. History of Nepal is incomplete without the history of Dolkha is a statement of Mr. Baburam Acharya, the famous historian of Nepal. Dolkhha was first known as Abhyapur.

This district, located at a distance of 132 km from the capital. It has been establishing itself as the perfect destination for internal and external tourism. The lowest height of this district is 732 meters (Sitley) and high altitude of 7134 meters (Gaurishankar) from the sea surface. The district headquarters, Charikot, is at 1970 meters high.

One of the major shrines of the Hindu devotees is the Dolakha bhimsen temple. The Bhimeshwar temple is situated in Dolakha Bazar of Bhimeshwar. The major statue of this temple is God Bhim. The statue in the temple is said to resemble three different gods: Bhimeshwar in the morning, Lord Shiva during the day and the Vishnu in the evening. The miraculous happening of Bhimsen statue of Dolakha is the sweating fluid like drops of warm water.

People believe that if any harmful bad and huge incident is going to happen in the near future in the country, then this statue warns the people through sweating. It has been said that this statue has started sweating a few months before the Narayanhiti Palace Massacre and also before the 2072 earthquake.

  1. Kathmandu:

The District Kathmandu is one of the 77 districts in Nepal and has 1.744.240 inhabitants (as of 2011) and an area of ​​395 km ². The district of Kathmandu is the most densely populated area of ​​Nepal. Kathmandu district is one of three districts in the Kathmandu Valley. It is in the hills of the Bagmati Zone.

The height of the area of ​​the Kathmandu district varies between 1262 m and 2732 m above sea level. The district is surrounded by the Bhaktapur district and Kabhrepalanchok in the east, Dhading, and Nuwakot in the west, in the north of Sindhupalchok and in the south of Lalitpur and Makwanpur.

Most of Nepal’s offices and industries are located in the Kathmandu district. Important economic centers are Durbar Marg and Putalisadak.  In addition to the production and export of handicrafts, art objects, clothing, pashmina and paper, tourism is one of the most important economic sectors of this region.

This is where Hindu and Buddhist pilgrims from all over the world come to visit the various religious sites such as Pashupatinath, Swayambhunath, Boudhanath, Budhanilkantha and Thamel, the tourist district of Kathmandu. Kathmandu valley is one of the major city of this district and is the capital of the nation.

The city has a rich, more than 2000-year history. The appearance of the capital remained from the 17th — 18th centuries when the Kathmandu valley was actively built during the reign of the kings of the Malla dynasty. Religious and cultural festivals are an important part of the life of citizens.

Most of the population of Kathmandu are Hindu followers, the second in number are the followers of religion Buddhism. Also in the city live followers of other religions, which makes Kathmandu one of the most cosmopolitan cities in the world.

The most common language of communication is Nepali. Kathmandu is the largest cultural and educational center in Nepal.  Here are the Royal Academy, National College, Sanskrit College, Tribhuvan University, Association of Fine Arts.

In addition, Kathmandu has the National Museum of Nepal, a numismatic museum and a number of libraries, among which are the National and Central. Kathmandu, Lalitpur, and Bhaktapur are so closely linked culturally that the monuments and landmarks of all three cities are listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List as a single object of protection.

  1. Kabhrepalanchok:

Kabhrepalanchok district is one of 77 districts in Nepal. It lies with its capital Dhulikhel in the administrative zone Bagmati. The 1396 km ² district is located east of the Kathmandu valley. According to the latest census in 2011, the district had 381,937 inhabitants in the year and the population density was 293 people / km².

Through Kabhrepalanchok leads the Araniko Highway, an important trunk road from Kathmandu to the Sino-Nepal Friendship Bridge on the border with the Tibet Autonomous Region. Another road from Dhulikhel southeast into the Terai is nearing completion.

It borders Sindhupalchok district (in the north), Kathmandu district (in the northwest), Bhaktapur and Lalitpur regions (in the west), the Makvanpur region of Narayani (in the southwest)  east). 62.57% of the population profess Hinduism;  34.62% is Buddhism;  1.78% is Christianity and 0.08% is Islam.

It is a rural and poor area, where illiteracy reaches 58.3% among women and 28.4% among men. The district is considered by the Nepalese authorities to be at high risk of malaria. In January 2008, an investigation indicated this area as the main reservoir for organ trafficking to India.

  1. Lalitpur:

It is located in the administrative zone of Bagmati. The district covers an area of ​​385 km² and had 466,784 inhabitants in the 2011 census. Lalitpur is one of three districts in Kathmandu Valley next to Kathmandu District and Bhaktapur District. 73.53% of the population profess Hinduism;  19.27% ​​is Buddhism;  5.02% – Christianity and 0.66% – Islam.

Once, the completely independent city of Lalitpur (the city of beauty) was the capital of the kingdom of the same name. And today it is one of the municipal districts of Kathmandu, separated only by the sacred Bagmati River (Bagmati). The ancient city of Patan, located 5 km south-east of Kathmandu, is known as the center of fine arts.

The number of Hindu temples, Buddhist pagodas, and monuments in the historic center exceeds the number of attractions in Kathmandu.  Many travelers believe that Durbar Square in Patan is much richer than traditional nevarskoy architecture and a variety of buildings, compared with the historical center of Kathmandu.

We cannot but agree with this because the whole city is one large museum, and each street hides the treasures of the Malla dynasty.  It is amazing that many of the objects of the Old Town’s architecture have been perfectly preserved to this day.

And the quality of bronze statuettes and metal attributes of Buddhism delights all historians because the city was founded in the III century. Be sure to visit the Patan Museum, located on Durbar Square, because it is considered to be the best museum in Nepal, and one of the best in Asia.

You will be amazed by a huge collection of bronze figurines, traditional jewelry, and jewels. Until 1768, Lalitpur was the capital of Nepal, which caused the development of culture, architecture and various crafts.  To this day, the city is famous for its traditions in bronze casting and wood carving.

The masters of Patan are also famous for their numerous jewelry and art workshops.  This is probably the best place to buy souvenirs made from precious metals, religious figurines or thankthangok (paintings that are made with Tibetan techniques of traditional Buddhist art depicting great teachers, enlightened gurus or deities).

Because prices are much more moderate than in Kathmandu and the wealth of choice will just drive you crazy. In the southwest of Patana, there is the only zoo in Nepal where you can get a closer look at Asian elephants, tigers, leopards, big turtles, and hippos.

Of course, the zoo is not the main attraction of Nepal, but if you come with children, then this is a great opportunity to get to know not only animals. But also local kids who are zoo regulars.  Moreover, where else can you see half-meter squirrels?  Also, in the zoo, you will find an old pond, built in the XVII century.

  1. Makwanpur:

The Makwanpur district is located in Inner Terai, in the administrative district of Narayani south of Kathmandu.  In 2001 it had 392,604 inhabitants, in 2011 it was 420,477.

It borders on the Chitwan region (in the west), the Parsa, Bara, and Rautakhat districts (in the south), the Sindhuli region of the Janakpur zone (in the east), the Dhading, Katmandu, Lalitpur, and Kavrepalanchok areas of the Bagmati zone (in the north).

The area of ​​the district is 2426 km². 48.26% of the population profess Hinduism;  45.57% is Buddhism;  4.84% – Christianity;  0.42% is Islam. Geographically, the district belongs to the hilly area of ​​the Mahabharat Lekh. The main ethnic group present in the district are the Tamangs.

The Makawanpur district is an important district from the economic, physiological and historical point of view. It is situated in almost the middle part of the country. This area has 2426 sq km. It is known as the main route of the capital, this district is under the border with Kathmandu and historic district Lalitpur.

This district is among the third largest industrial districts of the country.  There are many natural scenic sites here.  The coolest atmosphere can overcome the heart of anyone.  Chitwan National Park and Parsa Wildlife Reserve have also occupied some areas of this district.

The main profession of people here is agriculture through the district is known by the name of the industrial district.  In the total population of 82.7% of the total population are engaged in agriculture and 17.35 are non-agricultural.  Economically 53.6% of the active population is in agriculture and 46.9% of the population is involved in the non-agricultural occupation.

  1. Nuwakot:

This is located on the river Trishuli in the administrative zone Bagmati.  In the 2001 census, this administrative unit had 288,478 inhabitants, in 2011 there were 277,471. The district is named after the mountain village and the fortress of Nuwakot.

Built in the 18th century in the Mallastil on the trade route between Tibet and the Kathmandu valley, strategically above the town of Bidur. Nuwakot belonged to a total of 9 Ghora forts Prithvi Narayan Shah and was until his capture of Kathmandu in 1768, the capital of his empire.

It borders on the Rasuwa district (in the north), the Dhading district (in the west and south-west), the Kathmandu region (in the south-east) and the Sindhupalchok region (in the east).  The area of ​​the district is 1121 km ². The population according to the 2011 census is 277,471 people, of which 132,787 men and 144,684 women.

According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 288,478. 57.77% of the population profess Hinduism;  40.01% – Buddhism;  1.61% – Christianity and 0.13% – Islam. The district contains places of historical importance. The king of Nuwakot Kulmandan was Khan.

The historical palace Nuwakot is located at 76 km from west – north of Kathmandu and has been considered as a vital place since ancient times.  Before 1744 AD, Nepal was divided into multiple tiny states.

Nuwakot Durbar, the ancient traditional palace of King Prithvi Narayan Shah contains a historical and sentimental value of Nepal as he is the first king of the United Nepal Kingdom.  Located near the Trishuli Bazaar.

This seven-story palace of Nuwakot is now a destination for both domestic and foreign tourists to the Nepalese trackback history as well as to explore the architectural beauty of Durbar itself and the natural beauty of the surroundings.

Although the buildings have fallen, or partially supported it is still a place to see.  The houses are occupied and people live in tin houses.

  1. Ramechhap:

The district belongs to the administrative zone Janakpur.  At the 2001 census, it had 212,408 inhabitants, in 2011 there were 202,646. It borders on the Dolakha district (in the north and northwest), the Sindhuli district (in the south), the Solukhumbu and Okhaldhunga districts of the Sagarmatha zone (in the east) and the Kavrepalanchok region of the Bagmati zone (in the west).

The area of ​​the district is 1546 km². 71.93% of the population profess Hinduism;  24.67% is Buddhism;  1.57% – Christianity. The district is part of the Janakpur area in the Central Region. Geographically, the district belongs to the hilly area of ​​the Mahabharat Lekh.

The main ethnic group present in the district are the Chhetri. The Ramechhap hospital is located an hour away from the capital of the district, on top of a hill that is accessed, with much difficulty, in off-road vehicles.  This hospital provides health coverage to a dispersed population of some 20,000 people.

Ramhechap is also known as the district of three Lal.  The first martyr of Nepalese literature Subba Krishnalal Adhikari, Shahid Ganga Lal Shrestha and founder General Secretary Pushpa Lal Shrestha of Nepal Communist Party has been born in Ramechhap.

Ramechhap has borne all the talents of Nepali politics, arts, literature, industrialists, traders, scholars, cultural activists, and media activists.  On the geographical basis, Ramechhap is one of the six districts of Janakpur Zone. Ramechhaap has become unfortunate for the unuse of minerals.

Ramechhap is a reservoir of minerals but people have to be consumed in poverty due to lack of use. Ramechhap has a financially high-class group of about ten percent.  Although this group is a permanent resident of Ramechhap, it is now a group living in the capital.

  1. Rasuwa:

It is located in the administrative zone of Bagmati.  At the 2001 census, he had 44,731 inhabitants;  In 2011 there were 43,300. The Langtang massif in Rasuwa is home to a well-known high mountain trekking area, which is closest to Kathmandu.

The northeastern part of the district is largely part of Langtang National Park. It is part of the Bagmati zone, located approximately 120 km north of the country’s capital, Kathmandu.  The administrative center of the district is the village of Dhunche. Its the total area is 1544 km ².

Most of the region’s population are tamangs (64%), followed by the Brahmins (16%) and gurungas (7%). Rasuwa does not enjoy the attention of foreign travelers, as it is devoid of any significant natural attractions.  Unlike the Annapurna or Everest regions, there are no dizzying mountain views, and rivers, forests, and gorges are no different.

To get here from Kathmandu, you need ten hours to go on a bad bus on a very bad road. But, precisely because of this, Rasuwa remained a relatively untouched corner of the earth.  The inhabitants of the villages of Rasuwa have not yet undergone the onslaught of universal globalization and Americanization, and maintain their traditional way of life with little or no change.

The Rasuwa region consists of a dozen small villages inhabited by the Tamang people.  Now Nepal is trying to develop tourism in this region, and the track through the villages of Rasuwa is called Tamang Heritage Trek. People here are significantly different from those who live on popular tracks near Annapurna or Everest.

Poor, shy, poorly understood in English.  Tamang villages consist of stone houses with brightly painted windows.  The main handwork of the Tamangs is heavy rural work, which even old women are engaged in – young people do not willingly linger in these places.

Usually, Rasuwa is visited by those who are already accustomed to the glistening of snow-white peaks, and want to get closer acquainted with the inhabitants of distant villages still unspoiled by tourism.

  1. Sindhuli:

Sindhuli district is part of the Janakpur administrative area in the Central Development Region.  In 2001, the district had 279,821 inhabitants;  In 2011 there were 296,192. Bordered by Ramechhap district (north) areas Sarlahi District, Mahottari and Dhanusa district (south).

And areas udayapur district Okhaldhunga Sagarmatha Zone (east), area kavrepalanchok district Bagmati Zone (north-west) and the area of ​​Makwanpur District Narayani (in the south zone west).

The area of ​​the district is 2491 km². 64.47% of the population profess Hinduism;  30.43% – Buddhism;  0.98% – Christianity. Sindhuli is located about 300 kilometers east of Kathmandu, a remote district of Nepal, where many villages lack access or means of transport.  It was one of the first neighborhoods attacked by the communist party of Nepal Maoist (PCN-M) when the ‘people’s war’ began in February 1996.

Despite the efforts of the local population, life is still dominated by a total lack of basic needs including no roads, no transport, no new sources of income, no schools and not even drinking water.  Because many people live outside the lack of access to vehicles, many people are forced to walk up to two days for services and collect water and firewood on foot, which covers several kilometers a day.

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Schools, in particular, are suffering severely under these conditions: mud floors, missing windows, shales, shabby furniture, and chilling hygienic conditions are common.  General health is so problematic, due to a lack of a hospital, which is replaced by only some health centers to run by mostly unskilled staff, chronic equipment and far from being accessible.

Socially, the district is caught in unresolved problems and a long culture of violence that developed from the years of internal armed conflict.  The old one is manifest in the generalized gender and caste discrimination, with low caste people forbidden from using the wells themselves as members of the higher class.

But even more evident are the deep wounds of the war, suddenly erupting as violent confrontations among the settlers, even for seemingly trivial issues. However, there is a fine ray of life expectancy better in the villages.  Since the signing of the peace agreement, a number of community-based organizations and dedicated civil society – has been working to mitigate the climate of despair and violence.

Their efforts are channeled through discussion and interaction programs, awareness campaigns, workshops and training for villagers in peace, non-violence, dialogue, facilitation, mediation, and negotiation. As well as the essential task of closing the gap between the authorities of the state and the victims of the conflict.

In addition, these activists are working to identify the main victims of the violent struggles of the decade and their real needs for a return to a normal life.

  1. Sindhupalchok:

District Sindhupalchok is one of 77 districts in Nepal and has been under province no. 3 according to the 2015 constitution. It is located east of Kathmandu and was until 2015 in the administrative zone Bagmati.  At the 2011 census, Sindhupalchok had 287,798 inhabitants.

It borders on the Rasuwa district (in the north-west), the Nuwakot region (in the west), the Kathmandu region (in the south-west), the Kavrepalanchok district (in the south), the Dolakha district of the Janakpur zone (in the east) and the Tibet Autonomous Region of the PRC  -East).

The area of ​​the district is 2542 km².  Despite its proximity to the capital, Kathmandu, the area is one of the least developed in Nepal. 58.98% of the population profess Hinduism;  37.96% – Buddhism and 1.83% – Christianity. Geographically, the district belongs to the Himalayan mountainous area called Parbat.

The northern part of the district is part of the Langtang National Park. The main ethnic group present in the district is represented by the Tamangs. The major natural features of this district are the hot water resources, forestry, and mountain packages.

The presence of well-known tourist sites including Tatpotani Sections, Bunjijump and Helambu have also raised the identity of the district in the country and outside the country. Langtang National Park has occupied about a quarter of the total area of ​​the district.  This district is also included in the small area of ​​Shivpuri National Park.

Districts of province no. 4, Nepal

  1. Baglung:

It is part of the Dhaulagiri Administrative Region in the West Development Region.  The district covers the mountainous terrain south of the Dhaulagiri Massif and extends south of Myagdi Khola and west of Kali Gandaki.  It is part of the Dhaulagiri zone, which, in turn, is part of the western region of the country.

The administrative center is the town of Baglung. It borders on Parbat district (in the east), Myagdi district (in the north), Gulmi region of the Lumbini zone (in the south), Rukum, Rolpa and Pyutkhan areas of the Rapti zone (in the west).  The area of ​​the district is 1784 km².

The height of the area varies from 650 to 4300 m above sea level. The population according to the 2011 census is 268,613 people, of which 117,997 men and 150 616 women. According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 268,937 people.  89.27% ​​of the population profess Hinduism;  8.74% – Buddhism;  0.63% – Christianity and 0.27% – Islam.

The main crops are rice, corn, wheat, millet, and potatoes.  Earlier, iron and copper ores were mined in the district, however, then almost all the mines were closed. Geographically, the district belongs to the hilly area of ​​the Mahabharat Lekh.  In the north-western area is the Dhorpatan Game Reserve owned by the Nepalese royal house.

The main ethnic group present in the district is that of the Magar. The district has mainly inhabited Brahmins, Chhetris and Tribals.  Since the main profession is agriculture and the number of foreign employment in this district is significant. It is also known as the major districts which are involved in remittance.

The district has made another identity as a district of Jholunge Pul. Its natural beauty is still visible, culturally Baglung district is very wealthy.  Kali’s Bhagwati temple in Baglung market is an important religious place according to Hindu rites.

  1. Gorkha:

It is part of the Gandaki zone, which, in turn, is part of the western region of the country.  The administrative center is the city of Gorkha. It borders on Manang district (in the north-west), Lamjung region (in the west), Tanahu region (in the south-west), Chitwan district of the Narayani zone (in the south), Dhading district of the Bagmati zone (in the east) and the Tibet Autonomous Region of the PRC  in the north and northeast).

The area of ​​the district is 3610 km². The population according to the 2011 census is 271,061 people, including 121,041 men and 150,020 women. According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 288,134 people. 75.15% of the population profess Hinduism;  19.10% – Buddhism;  3.27% – Christianity and 1.13% – Islam. 12 km south of the city of Gorkha is the famous temple of Manakamana.

It is the area of ​​the former principality of Gorkha, which was also named after the famous Gurkha soldiers.  The epicenter of the earthquake was 18 km north-northeast of the city of Gorkha near Barpak. The 3610 km² districts are located in the central Himalayas, directly on the Chinese border in the center of Nepal.

Its neighboring districts are Lamjung, Manang, Tanahu, Dhading, and Chitwan.  Four major rivers run in and around the district: Chepe, Daraudi, Marsyangdi, and Budhigandaki.  In the northern mountainous areas of the district is the large Annapurna nature reserve.

The highest peak in the district of Gorkha is the Manaslu with 8163 m, which makes it the eighth highest mountain in the world.  Other high mountains in Gorkha are the Himal Chuli (7893 m) and the Ngadi Chuli (7871 m).

The district is more or less the same as the old principality of Gorkha, from which the unification of Nepal began in the eighteenth century and after which the kingdom of Gorkha was named.  The place Gorkha was home to the Shah dynasty.

His palace is still perched high above the city.  King Prithvi Narayan Shah conquered the Kathmandu Valley in 1768 and ascended the throne of the new kingdom.  It was renamed Nepal in the 1930s.  The city of Ghorka is a popular tourist destination. The largest ethnic group in this district are the Gurkha, but Gurung and Tamang also live in Gorkha.

  1. Kaski:

The District Kaski is a district in central Nepal. It belongs to the administrative zone Gandaki.  The administrative seat is Pokhara.  The district extends over 2017 km² and has 492,098 inhabitants (2011).

A significant ethnic group in the district of Kaski are the Gurung. The northern half of the district is occupied by the southern flank of the Annapurna massif. It borders on Manang (in the north), Lamjung (in the east), Tanahu (in the south-east), Syangja (in the south-west), Parbat and Myagdi regions of the Dhaulagiri region (in the west).

According to the 2011 census, the population is 492,098, of which 236,385 are men and 255,713 are women. According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 380,527 people.  82.33% of the population profess Hinduism;  13.47% – Buddhism;  2.14% is Christianity and 0.90% is Islam. Geographically, the district belongs to the hilly area of ​​the Mahabharat Lekh.

In the northern area of ​​the territory, there is the Annapurna massif with the peaks of Annapurna II (7.937), Annapurna III (7.555 m.), And Annapurna Sud (7.219 m.). And all the surrounding area falls within the homonymous protected area. The main ethnic group present in the district are the Bahun.

The city of Pokhara serves as the headquarters of the Kaski district and the western development region.  The city is located in the northwest corner of the Pokhara Valley and therefore the elevation of the city changes rapidly from 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) to over 7,500 meters (24,606 feet) only in a 30-kilometer section (18.64 miles).

The city has crossed the Seti Gandaki river and this river and its tributaries have led the city to have gorges and canyons in the city and surrounding areas.  The southern part of the city is located on Lake Phewa, while the northern part is close to the bottom of the Annapurna mountain range.

Much of the city’s economy and people work in the hospitality industry or city tourists.  That city is home to many medieval temples, as well as the most modern Buddhist temples and Hindu Bahamas.  Some noteworthy buildings are the two-story Tal Barahi Temple and the Pokhara Shanti Stupa World Peace pagoda built in 1999.

  1. Lamjung:

The district of Lamjung is a district of Nepal of 177,149 inhabitants, which has Besisahar as its capital. The district is part of the area of ​​Gandaki in the West Region. Geographically, the district belongs to the hilly area of ​​the Mahabharat Lekh.

The territory is crossed by the river Marsyandi (a tributary of the Trishuli) which originates under the Annapurna massif and flows first in a north-westerly direction to the south-east. Then arrived near the village of Khudi bend towards the south passing near the capital  Besisahar.

A dam was built a few kilometers downstream that feeds a 70 MW hydroelectric plant. The plant was inaugurated in December 2008, after a construction lasting about 8 years. The main ethnic group present in the district is that of the Gurung. The 1692 km ² district is located in the central Himalayas in the center of Nepal.

The literacy rate was 56% and the population density 104.7 people / km². The district is also rich in natural resources, which, however, must be left unused due to a lack of road infrastructure.  Most villages, however, are connected to a well-maintained network of supply paths.

Along these routes, the Annapurna Circuit trekking route also runs through the district of Lamjung, and many of its inhabitants now live on tourism (care and accommodation of trekking groups).

Most of the villages in the district are connected to the electricity grid. On December 14, 2008, the operation of the Mid-Marsyangdi Hydro Power Project (MMHEP), the second largest hydropower project in Nepal, started at 70 megawatts.

The project was started in June 2001 with joint investment by the Government of Nepal, Germany and the Nepal Electricity Authority.  The dam is located about 5 km southeast of Besisahar. Lamjung was declared a 17th district full literacy on 16 July 2015.

In 2019, according to a survey by the district, about eight percent of the population over six years were still illiterate.  The literacy rate for residents between the ages of six and sixty is more than 96%.

  1. Manang:

The District Manang is one of the 77 districts in Nepal. It lies with its capital Chame in the administrative zone Gandaki. The 2246 km² district is located directly on the Chinese border in the central Himalayas.

It’s district neighbors are Kaski, Lamjung, Gorkha, Mustang, and Myagdi. The topography is determined by the Marsyangdi River, which rises at 5413 m high. This pass also forms a transition to the Mustang district of Muktinath.

The district of Manang has an enormous wealth of fauna and flora. According to the census, the district had 9587 inhabitants in 2001 and the population density was 4.3 persons / km². The inhabitants of Manang have been traders from time immemorial.  Over time, the district has well-maintained care trails but no roads.

All goods must, therefore, be transported by mules, yaks or carriers.  On these trails also the trekking route Annapurna Circuit runs through the district Manang.  Meanwhile, the inhabitants live mainly from tourism (supply and accommodation of trekking groups).

But even the traditional agriculture and livestock (Yaks) is operated. 2.5 km east of the village Manang there is a relatively new, small airport. Geographically, the district belongs to the Himalayan mountainous area called Parbat.  In the northern area, on the border with Tibet, there are the peaks of Ratna Chuli (7,035 m.) And Himlung (7,126 m.).

In the eastern area, on the border with the district of Gorkha, are the Manaslu (8,163 m.  ), the Ngadi Chuli (7.871 m.) and the Himal Chuli (7.893 m.). While in the western zone, on the border with the district of Kaski, are the peaks of the Annapurna II (7.937 m.) and Annapurna III  (7,555 m.).

  1. Mustang:

The Mustang district is one of 77 districts in Nepal. It extends over the upper river valley of Kali Gandaki.  The northern two-thirds of the district (today: Upper Mustang) correspond to the former kingdom of Lo (Mustang Kingdom), which was annexed in the 18th century by the Kingdom of Gorkha and thus came to Nepal.

However, culture was and still is strongly influenced by Tibet. At the 2001 census, it had 14,981 inhabitants;  in 2011 it was 13,452.  It is after Manang the district with the lowest population in Nepal. Mustang has a continental mountain climate;  the temperatures are steadily increasing from north to south.

In Lo Mustang, for example, temperatures can drop below -20 ° C during the night while not even reaching -10 ° C in Jomsom.  In addition, Mustang is one of the driest regions in Nepal, as it lies in the rain shadow of the Himalayan main ridge.

The district is located in the north-west of the country;  it is connected to the Dhawalagiri area and is part of the Western Development Region.  The territory of the Mustang, which gave it its name, is included in its territory.  The surface is 3 573 km², which makes it the 5th largest district in the country after Dolpa, Humla, Taplejung, and Gorkha.

And the population is 13,452 inhabitants (in 2011). Due to its strategic geographical location, it was for a long time an obligatory stop for the caravans that arrived in Nepal from Tibet following the so-called Salt Route.

In addition, it was formerly a place of pilgrimage of Tibetan and Buddhist monks.  These two facts have influenced that at present Mustang is considered one of the best-preserved redoubts of genuinely Tibetan spirituality, traditional life, and religiosity.

Along with the rest of the landscape, one of the main attractions that the area offers to the naked eye is a large number of monasteries built during that time that are preserved.

  1. Myagdi:

The district is characterized by the deep valley of the Kali Gandaki between the massifs of Dhaulagiri and Annapurna.  Along the Gandaki, the Annapurna trail leads to the place Tatopani with its thermal bath directly on the river lies.

Another place along this trail is Ghodepani at about 2900 m with the nearby Pun Danda (Poon Hill) and the views of the peaks of Dhaulagiri and Annapurna. The district is located in the administrative area Dhaulagiri.

At the 2001 census, 114,447 people lived in Myagdi;  In 2011 it was 113,641. Bordered by Baglung (in the south), Parbat (in the south-east), Mustang (in the north), Kaski and Manang districts of the Gandaki zone (in the east and northeast). Dolpa of the Karnali zone (in the north-west)  and the Rukti area of ​​the Rapti zone (in the south-west).

The area of ​​the district is 2297 km ². Hindus and Buddhist religions are found in this district, as well as those who believe in Islam and Christianity.  In this district, the majority of the caste is found in the area like Bahun, Chhetri, Newar, Gurung, Giri, Sarki, Kami, Damai, Thakali, Hantyal and other species.

  1. Nawalparasi (Bardaghat Susta East)/ Nawalpur:

The district was created by the division of the district Nawalparasi on the newly created by the constitution of 2015 provinces Gandaki (formerly No. 4) and No. 5.

The District Assembly’s parliamentary assembly requested that the district be named Nawalpur on September 22, 2017. But experts in the federal government have stated that the name of the district can only be changed by amending the constitution of Nepal by a two-thirds majority.

Name of the new district has been set out in Annex 4 of the Constitution. Capital of the district is Kawasoti. It has about 310,000 inhabitants. The government has divided the Nawalaparasi as bardaghat susta east to be in province no. 4 as Nawalpur.

And the bardaghat susta west to be in province no. 5 as parasi. The major ethnic nationalities in Nawalpur are Bahun, Chhetri, and Tharu. The language they speak is Nepali, Awadhi, and Tharu. Newly established district in the year 2074 B. S.

Has the total area of 1426.27 sq. Km. The height of the district varies from 91 m to 1936 m. The total population of the district in the year 2074 B. S was 302,957 and the population density was 212.4 sq. Km.

  1. Parbat:

It is located in the administrative zone Dhaulagiri on the left bank of the Kali Gandaki below the Annapurna South. At the 2001 census, it had 157,826 inhabitants;  In 2011 it was 146,590. It borders the Baglung region (in the west), the Myagdi region (in the north-west), the Kaski and Syangja regions of the Gandaki zone (in the east and north-east), the Gulmi region of the Lumbini zone (in the south-west).

The area of ​​the district is 494 km². According to the 2011 census, the population is 146,590, of which 65,301 are men and 81,289 are women. According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 157,826 people.  89.48% of the population profess Hinduism;  9.32% – Buddhism;  0.45% Christianity and 0.43% Islam.

The district is known as a delightful district filled with geographical diversity. The possibility of tourism development is high in this district due to the spectacular scenery of the Himalayas, far-sighted scenes and the beautiful sight of the Sunrise. Bahun, Chhetri, Magar, Kami, Gurung, Damai, Sarki, Kunwar, Newar, Gharti, Sanyaasi, Kumal, Vote, Majhi, Thakali and Muslim are the inhabitants of the place.

Even if the district is small, there is historical proof that there is to be the production of slate stones, iron mines, copper mines.

  1. Syangja:

Geographically, the district belongs to the hilly area of ​​the Mahabharat Lekh. The district is crossed by an important road artery, the Siddhartha Rajmarg which connects Pokhara in the north with Butwal in the south.

It is part of the Gandaki zone, which, in turn, is part of the western region of the country. It borders on Kaski (in the north), Tanahu (in the east), Gulmi and Palpa areas of the Lumbini zone (in the south and south-west) and Parbat region of the Dhaulagiri zone (in the west).

The area of ​​the district is 1164 km². The population according to the 2011 census is 289,148 people, of whom 125,833 are men and 163,315 women.  According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 317,320 people.  90.21% of the population profess Hinduism;  7.44% – Buddhism;  0.68% is Islam and 0.20% is Christianity.

The district is located in the center of Nepal in the foothills of the Himalayas. It’s district neighbors are Kaski in the north, Tanahu in the east, Palpa in the south and Gulmi and Parbat in the west.

The Kali Gandaki flows along the western and southern district borders while the left tributary Aadhi Khola crosses the district. The largest ethnic groups in this district are the Brahmins, Kshatriya, Gurung, and the Magar. The Siddharta Rajmarg, one of the oldest overland roads in Nepal.

And named after the historical Buddha Siddhartha Gautama, has been leading for over 40 years from Pokhara via Putalibazar to Butwal and on to Siddharthanagar on the Indian border. The largest hydropower project in Nepal is located in Syangja district.

The power plant Kali Gandaki A in Mirmi near Tansen has a total capacity of 144 MW (3 Francis turbines with 48 MW each).  The power plant was put into operation in 2002. It is trying to further develop tourism in the region, especially trekking, rafting, and climbing.

  1. Tanahu:

One of the beautiful district of province no. 4 Tanahu has the area of 1546 km². The district is located in the center of Nepal in the foothills of the Himalayas.  Its district neighbors are Kaski, Lamjung and Gorkha in the north, Chitwan in the east, Nawalparasi and Palpa in the south and Syangja in the west.

The district is bordered to the south by the lower reaches of the Kali Gandaki and to the east by the Marsyangdi.  Through the district flows the Seti Gandaki and its left tributary Madi Khola. According to the census, the district had 315,237 in 2001 with a population density of 203.9 people/km².

The largest ethnic inhabitants in this district are the Gurung.  Many residents of Madi Khola live from fishing. Bandipur is located on a hill in the district of Tanahu, in the Gandaki area of ​​Nepal.

Due to being a well-preserved village and its ancient cultural environment, Bandipur has been in the tourist’s focus of attention. Bandipur lies at an altitude of 1030 meters above sea level in the Mahabharat mountain range. And approximately 700 meters above the Marsyangdi river valley, 143 kilometers west of Kathmandu and 80 kilometers east of Pokhara.

Since 1998 the town is connected by an 8-kilometer road to the Kathmandu-Pokhara highway.  Until then there was only an unreliable road, which normally was only accessible to tractors during monsoons.

The hills around Bandipur are ideal for hiking, and the trails will take you through indigenous villages, green forests, “places of power” or hill sanctuaries. It’s average elevation, it’s excellent picturesque views of the Himalayas (Dhaulagiri, Annapurna, Manaslu, Ganesh, Langtang Himal, the Marsyangdi valley, Mount Manakamana and Gorkha with its palace perched on high).

It’s easy accessibility and of course its population style  Old Newar, they make Bandipur a place of tourist interest with some hostels and hotels.

Districts of province no. 5, Nepal

  1. Arghakhanchi:

The Arghakhanchi district is one of 77 districts in Nepal and has been ranked under province no. 5 since the Constitution of 2015. At the 1991 census, it had a population of 180,884, in 2001 there were 208,391 and in 2011 197,632.  Two-thirds of the district area is in the area of ​​the Mahabharat, one third in the Siwaliks.

The naming was based on two principalities, Argha and Khanchi, which existed until annexation by the Kingdom of Gorkha in 1786.  They belonged to the group of the so-called Chaubisi Rajya, twenty-four principalities that existed in the catchment area of ​​Gandak in this region.

It is part of the Lumbini zone, which, in turn, is part of the western region of the country.  It borders on the Gulmi region (in the north), the Palpa region (in the east), the Rupandehi district (in the southeast), the Kapilvastu region (in the south), the Pyuthan and Dang regions of the Rapti zone (in the west).  The area of ​​the district is 1193 km².

The height of the district varies from 305 to 2575 m above sea level. The population according to the 2011 census is 197,632 people, of which 86,266 men and 111,366 women. According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 208,39. 97.03% of the population is Hindu religion;  1.92% Buddhism;  0.90% is Islam and 0.11% is Christianity.

The area of the district is about 1232 sq km.  This district is at the height of 305 meters to 2515 meters high above sea level. Due to the varieties in the climate, varieties are also found in animals and vegetable.

  1. Banke:

The district of Banke is a district of Nepal of 385.840 inhabitants which has Nepalgunj as its capital. The district is part of the Bheri area in the Middle West Region. Geographically, the district belongs to the flat area of ​​the southern Terai on the border with the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.

In the west, it is bordered by the Bardiya region, in the north and east by the Dang and Salyan areas of the Rapti zone, in the south by the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. The area of the district is 2337 km ². Most of the area is located in the Rapti River Basin, with the exception of the extreme west, which is located in the Babai River Basin.

Both rivers flow to the southeast and flow into India into the Ghagra River (in the territory of Nepal it is known as Karnali). The population according to the 2011 census is 491,313 people, of whom 244,255 are men and 247,058 are women.

According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 385,840. According to the Nepal government’s commitment to tiger conservation with the international community, 550 sq. Km of Banke, Dang and Salyan are gathered to form the Banke National Park. This is the main habitats of tiger and elephants.

  1. Bardiya:

Bardiya district is another beautiful district of province no. 5. In the west, it borders on the Kailali area of ​​the Seti zone, in the north – with the Surkhet district, in the east – with the Bank district, in the north-east – with the Salyan region of the Rapti zone.

In the south – with the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.  The total area of the district is 2025 km ². Most of the area lies within the terai physiographic region and is a fertile plain occupied by agricultural land and forests.  The extreme north of the region is occupied by the Sivik (Churia) mountain range. Here is the Bardia National Park (968 km²).

The population according to the 2011 census is 426,576 people, of which 205,080 are men and 221,496 women. According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 382,649 people. In the northern part of the district is the Royal Bardia National Park which occupies the whole territory north of the H01 national road (called Mahendra Rajmarg or Mahendra Highway).

The most widespread ethnic group in the district is that of the Tharus, which exceed 50% of the population. Bardiya was a part of the Kingdom of Gorkha when it had to be ceded in the Treaty of Sugauli in 1815 to Britain.  Under the reign of Jang Bahadur Rana, it was returned to Nepal in 1860 with Banke, Kailali, and Kanchanpur.

  1. Dang:

The Dang Deukhuri district often called the Dang, is a district in the interior of Terai in the Rapti administrative district of Nepal, about 280 km west of Kathmandu, bordering India. The district is dominated by two large, east-west and parallel valleys of the Mahabharat, the Dang, and the Deukhuri.

They are separated by the approximately 800 m high (above sea level) belt-running mountain range of the Dudhwas.  The north and wider Dang valley are located at about 600 m altitude (above sea level), while the Deukhuri Valley is located at about 250 m.

The latter is in turn separated by the strip-like running, about 600 m high mountain range of Siwaliks from the Outer Terai and the Gangesebene. The dry and unproductive land of the Dudhwa Mountains has in the past created a buffer between the Gangese Plane and Inner Terai cultures.

The Deukhuri Valley, like the entire Terai, was malaria-infested until the late 1950s and is still sparsely populated, mostly by the Tharu, who have developed some resistance to malaria.

The drier and higher-lying Dang Valley was less affected by malaria and was, therefore, more attractive to settlers from the South, especially after malaria was largely displaced in the 1960s.  The two cities of the district, Ghorahi, and Tulsipur are located in the Dang Valley.

  1. Eastern Rukkum:

Rukum was divided into two parts as per the new Constitution in 2072 B.S. Asoj. Two years later, the new district was formed by the name of Rukum east thereby making the youngest district of the country. Rukumkot is an old town situated at the headquarters of the new district.

Local people have been very happy after creating a new district and of government decision to keep an office in Rukumot. It is the Himalayan district which is backward from the developmental point of view. But it has numerous possibilities for development.

Eastern Rukum headquarter is filled with natural touristic and historical heritage such as Kamal Dah, Deurali Cave and Bhagwati Temple, Shiva Temple, etc. Similarly, there are more than a dozen Himalayas including Putha Himalayan and since sisne himal.

The major ethnic inhabitants of the district are the Magars. There is a great possibility of hiking, mountaineering, paragliding thereby attracting internal and international tourists. Geographical deterrence is the main challenge of this region.  Education, health, and communication in this area have not yet developed.

  1. Gulmi:

One of the beautiful district of province no. 5, Gulmi extends between the Jhimruk Khola in the west and the lower reaches of the Kali Gandaki in the east. At the 2001 census, he had 296,654 inhabitants;  In 2011 there were 280,160.  Geographically, the district belongs to the hilly area of ​​the Mahabharat Lekh.

The main ethnic groups present in the district are the Bahun. It borders on the Argkhakhanchi district (in the south-west), the Palpa district (in the southeast), the Syangja region of the Gandaki zone (in the east), the Baglung and Parbat regions of the Dhaulagiri zone (in the north) and the Pyutkhan region of the Rapti zone (in the west).

The area of ​​the district is 1149 km². The district is part of the birthplace of the pioneer of Peace, Gautam Buddha, Lumbini Zone. The Gulmi District is famous for coffee and Orange farming. Ruru, now also known by Ridi, is a market center where multiple temples are located. Makar Sankranti and other festivals are celebrated here and are popular among both tourists and local people.

  1. Kapilbastu:

The Kapilbastu district is part of the Lumbini administrative area in the West Development Region.  In 2001, the district had a population of 481,976;  In 2011 it was 571,936. The administrative seat is the city Kapilavastu in Terai. Historically, the district was part of the Shakya Kingdom in the north of India.

According to tradition, this family was known in the 6th century BC.  Siddhartha Gautama, the later Buddha. Geographically, the district belongs to the flat area of ​​the Terai. The main ethnic groups present in the district are the Muslims and the Tharus.

It borders on the Argkhakhanchi district (in the north), the Rupandehi district (in the east), the Dang district of the Rapti zone (in the northwest) and the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh (in the south and southwest).  The area of ​​the district is 1738 km².  The height of the district varies from 93 to 1491 m above sea level.

Two physiographic regions can be distinguished: the Terai plain region and the Sivik (Churia) low range. According to the 2011 census, the population is 571,936 people, of which 285,599 are men and 286,337 are women.

According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 481,976 people. Approximately 48% of the population consider Avadhi as their mother tongue, 18% – Urdu, 17% – Tharu, and 17% – Nepali.  80.62% of the population profess Hinduism;  18.16% is Islam;  0.87% is Buddhism and 0.19% is Christianity. Most of the population of the district depends on agriculture, whose main crops are rice, wheat, and sugarcane.

  1. Parasi/ Bardaghat susta west:

Parasi is the name of a district of Nepal. In the year 2018 B. S. One unified district nawalparasi was formed by annexing Nawalpur in the east and parasi in the west. In 2074 B. S., It was again separated and Nawalpur and Parasi two individual district were formed.

The area of ​​Bardaghat Susta west has already been agreed to be Parasi district and its headquarters in Parashi. The total area of the district is 735.73 sq. Km. The height of the district varies from 91 m to 1936 m. From the sea level.

The major ethnic group living in the area are Bahun, Chhetris, and Tharu. The population density of the district is 433 sq. Km. The main languages that are spoken in the district are Nepali, Awadhi, and tharu.

  1. Palpa:

The district belongs to the Lumbini administrative district in southern Nepal.  It has an area of ​​1373 km ² and had at the 2001 census 268,558 inhabitants, in 2011 there were 261,180.

The district of Palpa extends south of the lower reaches of the Kali Gandaki. It borders on the Argkhakhanchi district (in the west), the Gulmi region (in the north-west), the Rupandehi region (in the south), the Navalparasi region (in the east), the Syangja and the Tanahu regions of the Gandaki region (in the north). 90.52% of the population profess Hinduism;  7.82% – Buddhism;  0.88% – Christianity and 0.47% – Islam.

Tansen is a beautiful town in the district of Palpa in the hills of western Nepal.  It is located on the road between Butwal and Pokhara, in the Mahabharat mountain range looking towards the Kaligandaki river valley to the north.  This town enjoys a temperate climate with temperatures that rarely exceed 30 ºC or rarely drop below 0 ºC.

Because it is higher than Kathmandu, the weather is very pleasant in the monsoon season.  The old Newari population of Tansen has an incredible history and wonderful architecture.

In Tansen, we find a labyrinth of steep, narrow and perhaps winding alleyways with shops and temples.  In addition to the commerce, in the newar premises, we can see works in metal.  An important point is an octagonal pavilion in the center of Sitalpati, the main market square.

  1. Pyuthan:

Geographically, the district belongs to the hilly area of ​​the Mahabharat Lekh.  The territory is crossed by the Jhimruk Khola and the Madi Khola (tributaries of the Rapti) whose valleys form the heart of the district.

In 1994, a 12 MW hydroelectric power plant was put into operation that collects water from the Jhimruk Khola at the village of Khaira. And conveys it to the Nayagaun power plant about 200 meters below, through a tunnel about 2 km long, unloading them.  then in the Madi Khola.

This diversion of water from the Jhimruk Khola basin to that of the Madi Khola resulted in a series of socio-environmental problems in the valley of the Jhimruk Khola downstream of the catchment near Khaira. Pyuthan is a district in the Rapti area of ​​Nepal.

The district covers an area of ​​1 309 km² and has a population of 212,484. The northern part of the district is near to the Himalayas so the weather is quite cold in here. While the southern part of the district being near to the inner terai is warm from Chaitra to jestha.

  1. Rolpa:

The district Rolpa is one of 77 districts in Nepal and belongs to the province No. 5 since the constitution of 2015. Historically, Rolpa was a principality that belonged neither to the west lying Chaubisi Rajya nor to the eastern Baise Rajya.

In 1769 it was annexed by the Kingdom of Gorkha under Prithvi Narayan Shah and has since been part of Nepal. In the civil war in 1996-2006 Rolpa was a stronghold of the Maoists and the scene of many conflicts. The district belonged until 2015 to the administrative area Rapti.

Agriculture, including livestock, and home-based production are the main economic sectors of the district.  Over 95% of households have agriculture as the main source of income.

However, due to the limited employment opportunities in Rolpa, many young men work abroad, causing a considerable amount of money to flow into the district through remittances from abroad. Rolpa is one of the less developed areas of Nepal with a low life expectancy (52 years) and a median income of less than $ 100 per capita.

In 2017, it was one of the ten poorest and underdeveloped districts in Nepal, with a value of less than 0.4 of the Human Development Index.

  1. Rupandehi:

The district of Rupandehi is a district of Nepal of 231,285 inhabitants and part of the Lumbini area in the Western Region. Geographically, the district belongs to the flat area of ​​the Terai.

In the territory, there is the famous Buddhist religious site of Lumbini where according to tradition Siddhartha Gautama, the founder of Buddhism, was born. The main ethnic groups present in the district are the Bahun and the Tharu.

In connection of this district, many religious, historical and archaeological places, industrial and technical areas, agriculture, environment. And areas of biological diversity-related economic and tourist importance places are found in the district.

Siddharthanagar previously known as Bhairahava, is a city in the south of the central part of Nepal, in the Rupandehi region of the Lumbini zone of the country’s western region. The economy of the city is based on trade, which contributes to a favorable border position.

There are small industrial enterprises that include several cement plants, a paper mill, and food processing enterprises.  Gautama Buddha Airport, located 3 km from the city center, takes regular flights from Kathmandu.

Districts of province no. 6, Nepal

  1. Dailekh:

The district of Dailekh is one of 77 districts in Nepal and belongs to the province of Karnali since the constitution of 2015. The district belonged until 2015 to the administrative zone Bheri.

At the 2001 census, Dailekh District had 225,201;  In 2011, there were 261,770. In the west, it borders on the Achham region of the Sethi zone, in the north – on the Kalikot region of the Karnali zone, on the east – on the Jajarkot region and in the south on the Surkhet region.

The total area of the district is area – 1502 km ².  The district of Dailakh is diverse in geographical landscapes ranging from mountains to the narrow valleys. Because the district is full. of mountains, in winter other is usually covered with snow and in summer the area becomes warm.

The district is Rich in Natural heritage, minerals, and herbs. Due to different landscaping and climate, there are natural resources of different minerals, birds, Flora and fauna, herbs, rivers, and lakes.

  1. Dolpa:

Dolpa District is one of 77 districts in Nepal and has been part of Karnali Province since the 2015 constitution and is the largest district in Nepal by area. The administrative headquarters are located in Ward Dunai of the city of Thuli Beri.

The district is considered one of the most remote areas of Nepal.  Dolpa is surrounded to the east by the former kingdom Lo (today Mustang), to the south by the districts of Myagdi, Rukum, and Jajarkot and to the west by the two districts Jumla and Mugu.  In the north, the region borders the Tibet Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China.

Until November 2018, it had no road connection to other districts.  On November 18, a 103 km long road was opened by Pasagadh in the district of Jajarkot, which connects the main town Dunai with the national road network. Almost half of the district is occupied by 3555 km ² of the Sche-Phoksundo National Park.

This is located in the northern part of the district, the Dolpa region. The district was originally located in the administrative zone Karnali. In 2011, 36,700 inhabitants lived in Dolpa. The population is predominantly Hindu or Buddhist;  about 5% are followers of the old Bön religion.

  1. Humla:

The district of Humla is one of 77 districts in Nepal and belongs to the province of Karnali since the constitution of 2015. The administrative seat is Simikot. The district is located in the extreme northwest of the country and borders Tibet (PR China).

It includes a glaciated mountain range north of the Himalayan main ridge.  Humla is traversed by the Humla Karnali initially south-southeast and later southwest.  The district is located in the catchment area of ​​Humla Karnali. Humla was the end of 2018, the only district that was not connected to the national road network.

After in November, the neighboring district Dolpa was connected by a road with the district Jajarkot.  In addition, in 2017, it was one of the ten poorest and underdeveloped districts in Nepal, with a value of less than 0.4 of the Human Development Index.

Humla is located at an altitude of 1524 meters to 7337 meters above sea level.  Due to the mountainous terrain, largely with rocks, gravel or snow, only about half of the area of ​​the district is suitable for agriculture.  Only a small amount of wheat and barley are grown, the main food source is potatoes.

The maximum temperature in this district is between 10 ° C and 25 ° C and the minimum temperature is between -10 ° and -28 °.  The annual rainfall of between 25.4 and 146.9 mm is comparatively low compared to other areas of Nepal.

  1. Jajarkot:

The district of Jajarkot is one of 77 districts in Nepal and has been part of Karnali Province since the 2015 constitution. The district belonged until 2015 to the administrative zone Bheri. Jajarkot ranked among the ten poorest and underdeveloped districts in Nepal in 2017, with a value of less than 0.4 in the Human Development Index.

At the 2001 census, he had 134,868 inhabitants, in 2011 there were 171,304. Geographically, the district belongs to the hilly area of ​​the Mahabharat Lekh.  In the eastern part, the Thuli Bheri river, a tributary of the Karnali (or Ghaghara) flows to mark the border with the district of Rukum.

Due to the geographical area, it is a high mountainous district in the middle mountainous region. The Nasai Dav in the western part of the district is considered to be very vital from the religious point of view. Likewise, there is also the temple of bhairavnath.

  1. Jumla:

The district of Jumla is one of 77 districts in Nepal and belongs to the province of Karnali since the constitution of 2015. The Tila River, a right tributary of the Karnali River, flows through the district in a west-southwestern direction.

The district administration is located in Jumla, the capital of the city of Chandannath. The Jumla District cultivates rice from 2,400 meters to 3,050 meters high.  This is the highest rice cultivation area of ​​Nepal.

The cultivated variety Jumli Marsi is particularly cold-tolerant and is probably grown in Jumla for 1300 years on the banks of the river Tila. In the west, it borders on the Kalikot region, in the north – on the Mugu region, in the east – on the Dolpa region and in the south on the Jajarkot region of the Bheri zone.  The total area – 2531 km ².

  1. Kalikot:

Kalikot District is one of 77 districts in Nepal and has been part of Karnali Province since the 2015 constitution. The Karnali flows through the western part of the district in a southwesterly direction. The left tributary Tila crosses the eastern part.

The district administration is located in Manma, since 2017, a district of the newly founded city Khandachakra, at the confluence of the two rivers. In 2017, Kalikot ranked among the ten poorest and most underdeveloped districts in Nepal, with a value of less than 0.4 in the Human Development Index. The Kalikot district is Rich in water heritage.

Karnali, the longest river of Nepal coming out of the mansarovar in Tibet region flows through the district. Kalikot district is the entrance gate of Humla, Jumla, Mugu district.  The Karnali Corridor, which is a project of national pride, and 200 kilometers in the inner road of Kalikot district are under construction.

The temple of Badi Malika is situated at the border of Kalikot and Bajura district is important from the religious point of view. The safeguard and promotion of these tourist and religious places in the district could help in raising the economic status of the district.

  1. Mugu:

Mugu district is one of 77 districts in Nepal and has been part of Karnali Province since the 2015 constitution. Mugu is one of the most remote districts in the country. It is also one of the ten poorest and underdeveloped districts with a value of less than 0.4 in the Human Development Index.

In Mugu is the largest lake in Nepal, the 8 km² Rara Lake at an altitude of 2900 m. Geographically, the district belongs to the Himalayan mountainous area called Parbat.  In the western part of the district, there is the Rara National Park with the lake of the same name, while in the eastern part there is part of the Shey-Phoksundo National Park.

In the west, it borders the Bajura region of the Seti zone, in the north – the Humla region, in the south – the Kalikot and Jumla regions, in the east – the Dolpa region and in the northeast – the Tibet Autonomous Region of China.

  1. Salyan:

Salyan district is part of the Rapti zone, which, in turn, is a part of the country’s Midwest region. It borders on Rukum district (in the north), Rolpa region (in the east), Dang district (in the south), Jajarkot, Surkhet, Bardia, and Bank of Bheri (in the west).  The area of ​​the district is 1462 km².

The population according to the 2011 census is 242,444 people, of which 115,969 men and 126,475 women. According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 213,500. 97.7% of the population profess Hinduism;  1.28% – Christianity;  0.82% is Buddhism and 0.11% is Islam.

Due to the geographical rigidity and physical infrastructure, the population is suffering from very hard lives. The economy of the people here is based on traditional farming. However, gradual change is being seen in the lives of the people.

Here, Bahun, Rai, Magar, Kami, has been the major ethnicity of the district. All round development of this district has been opened after the construction of Rapti Highway.  Sharda River is the main water heritage of this district.

  1. Surkhet:

The Surkhet district is one of 77 districts in Nepal and has been part of Karnali Province since the 2015 constitution. It is located about 370 km west of Kathmandu.

A dominant landscape part of the district is the Surkhet basin with a diameter of 6 to 9 km at a height of about 650 m (above sea level), at the northern edge of which is the town of Birendranagar.  From the middle of the district rises a small wooded and about 70 m high hill on which the Buddhist monastery ruin of Kankrebihar is located.

It is part of the Bheri zone, which, in turn, is a part of the Midwest region of the country. In the north, it borders with Dailekh and Jajarkot districts, in the south – with Bardiya district, in the west – with Achham, Doty and Kailali areas of Seti zone, in the east – with Salyan district of Rapti zone.

Surkhet is located in the physiographic region of the Inner Terai, which is located between the Sivalik ridge (in the south) and the foothills of the Himalayas (in the north).  The climate of the region is moderate, in winter temperatures can drop to 5 ° C, and in summer – rise to 38 ° C

  1. Western Rukkum:

District Rukum West is one of 77 districts in Nepal and was created under the 2015 constitution. It is part of the province Karnali. The district was created by dividing the district of Rukum into the provinces Gandaki (formerly No. 6) and No. 5 newly created by the constitution of 2015.

By experts of the Federal Government stated that the name of the district can be changed only by a change of the constitution of Nepal with a two-thirds majority. Since the name of the new district was specified in Annex 4 of the constitution.

According to Karnali Chief Minister Mahendra Bahadur Shahi in May 2018, however, the name is met with public acceptance, so changing the name does not seem necessary. In fact, the district became operational and self-governing only two years after it was created in 2017 during the local representative elections.

Until then, the two new districts were jointly managed by the previous district administration of the former district.

Districts of province no. 7, Nepal

  1. Bajura:

The district Bajura is one of 77 districts in Nepal and has been part of the Sudurpashchim province since the constitution of 2015.  The administrative seat is Martadi. The district was until 2015 in the administrative zone Seti. The district covers the eastern edge of the Guran Himal.

Along the eastern district, border flows the Humla Karnali south.  The Karnali, whose continuation below the confluence of the Mugu Karnali, flows through the extreme east of the district.  Another important river in the district of Bajura is the Budhiganga, which drains the western part of the district to the southwest.

The 6935 m high eastern summit of the Saipal (also Tiger Top) in the northwest corner of the district forms the highest point of Bajura. Bajura was the poorest district in Nepal with a Human Development Index of 0.32 a year.  By comparison, the capital Kathmandu had an index of 0.71 at this time. The attraction of this district is the khaptad area.

Khaptad is a remote plateau covered with grass and trees at an altitude of about 3000 meters.  The fact that Khatpad National Park is located in a very remote place makes it very attractive for adventure lovers.

Moreover, it is the only national park of average heights in the far west of Nepal with a unique ecosystem.  Due to its remoteness, most areas of the park remain primitive and untouched from the outside world.  Occupying an area of ​​225 square kilometers, the park is not only a nature reserve but also a religious center.

The newest national park of Nepal is located where the Bajura, Bajhang, Doti, and Achaam districts are connected.

  1. Bajhang:

District Bajhang is one of 77 districts in Nepal and has been part of the province of Sudurpashchim since the 2015 constitution. It was until 2015 in the administrative zone of Seti. The upper course of the Seti flows through the district in predominantly south-southwestern direction.  In the extreme north of the district is the Himalayan massif Gurans Himal.

The administrative headquarters is located in the former VDC Chainpur, now part of the municipality Jayaprithvi. Bajhang was one of the ten poorest and underdeveloped districts in Nepal in 2017, with a value of less than 0.4 of the Human Development Index.

In the south, it borders with the Doti and Achham districts, in the east with the Bajura district, in the northeast with the Humla region of the Karnali zone, in the west with the Darchula and Baitadi regions of the Mahakali zone, in the north with the Tibet Autonomous Region of China. The population according to the 2011 census is 195,159 people, of which 92,794 men and 102,365 women. According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 167,026 people.

  1. Doti:

Doti District is one of 77 districts in Nepal and has been part of the Sudurpashchim Province since the 2015 constitution. Until 2015, the district belonged to the administrative zone Seti.

The district is located in the west of the country and stretches across the Himalayas.  It is bordered to the south by the rivers of Thuligad and Karnali.

The River Seti flows along the northwestern boundary of the district, then makes a curve to the east-southeast and traverses the center of the district and passes through the administrative center Dipayal Silgadhi.  The river then forms the southeastern district boundary in the lower reaches.

In the northeast of the district extends the Khaptad National Park. Agriculture (including livestock and poultry) and home working are the main industries of the district.  Agriculture is the main source of income for more than 90% of households.

Nepali is the most widely spoken language, followed by languages ​​such as Kham-Magar and Tamang. Gender discrimination is widespread in Doti. Women suffer from gender and domestic violence, gender discrimination in education, housework, nutrition, and various social and cultural norms. Women have neither land nor house in about 97% of households.

They are less involved in economic activities than men and are mostly confined to housework and agriculture.  Discrimination against women also occurs in the practice of Chhaupadi of banishing women into a hut during their menses.  In addition, Doti also has domestic violence related to excessive alcohol consumption.

  1. Achham:

Achham district is one of 77 districts in Nepal and has been part of the province of Sudurpashchim since the 2015 constitution. The administrative seat is Mangalsen.

Achham is one of the most remote districts in the country.  However, compared to other districts in the region, Achham is relatively well connected to Nepal’s road network, with more than half of the former Village Development Committees attached to it.

The district stretches across the Himalayas.  It is bordered to the west by the lower reaches of the Seti and to the southeast and south by the Karnali.  The Budhiganga flows through the northwestern part of Achham.

In the extreme northwest of the district extends the Khaptad National Park. Achham was one of the ten poorest and underdeveloped districts in Nepal in 2017, with a value of less than 0.4 of the Human Development Index.

Agriculture (including livestock and poultry), home production and trade are the district’s main sources of income.  Agriculture is the main source of income for around 89% of households.  Around 52% of the area is covered with forest so that in addition to forestry there is also great potential for the collection and processing of herbs.

  1. Darchula:

The district of Darchula is one of 77 districts in Nepal and has been part of the province of Sudurpashchim since the constitution of 2015. Until 2015 Darchula belonged to the Mahakali administrative area.

In the west, the Mahakali River separates the district from the neighboring Indian state of Uttarakhand. In the north, it borders with the Tibet Autonomous Region of China, in the east with the Bajhang region of the Sethi zone, in the west with the Indian state of Uttarakhand and in the south with the Nepalese Baitadi district.

The population according to the 2011 census is 133,274 people, of which 63,605 are men and 69,669 are women. According to the 2001 census, the population numbered 121,996. Most of the population is represented by Pahari peoples.  98.88% of the population are Hindu religion;  0.88% is Buddhism;  0.06% – Christianity.

Darchula is one of the most backward areas of the country.  Approximately 58.4% of the population lives below the poverty line;  approximately 89.9% of the population is completely dependent on agriculture.  The area is characterized by traditional farming, using outdated tools;  lack of basic infrastructure;  low literacy rates.

  1. Baitadi:

Baitadi came to Nepal in 1791.  It belonged until 2015 to the administrative zone Mahakali. The district is located in the far west of Nepal on the Indian border and extends from the Mahakali in the west to the Seti in the east.

The left Mahakali tributaries Chameliya Khola and Sarnaya Khola run along the northern and southern borders of the district.  Baitadi is located south of Gurans Himal. Agriculture, including livestock and poultry farming, as well as beekeeping and home-based production are the main economic sectors of the district.

Wheat, rice, and corn are the main agricultural products that are produced in the district along with other crops such as vegetables and sugar cane.  Around 54% of the area is covered with forest.  In addition to forestry, this also offers the potential for the collection and processing of herbs.

Women suffer from gender discrimination in education, nutrition, social and cultural norms.  Discrimination against women occurs also in the form of the practice called Chhaupadi to banish women during their menstruation in a hut.

Systemic discrimination is still widespread in the district.  The district is home to a number of oppressed groups, such as the former haliya (slave-to-be-bonded slaves).

  1. Dadeldhura:

The district is located in the west of Nepal.  The Mahakali River separates the district in the west from the neighboring Indian state of Uttarakhand. Dadeldhura is located at an altitude of 333 m to 2639 m above sea level, so it extends from the Terai to the hilly Himalaya region.

Due to the different altitude, Dadeldhura lies in different climates.  Thus, the average maximum temperature is 32 ºC, while the average minimum temperature is only 3.6 ºC.  The annual average rainfall is about 1346.6 mm. The district is well connected to the road network of Nepal.

Dadeldhura thus serves as access to various hilly areas or districts in the region such as Achham, Doti, Baitadi, Bajura. Agriculture, including livestock and poultry farming, manufacturing, services such as hotels and tourist lodges are the main industries in the district.

The district has abundant forestry resources, some 78% of the area is forested, and has forestry potential for herb collection and processing.

  1. Kanchanpur:

The district is located in the far west of Nepal in the Terai on the Mahakali (Sharda), a tributary of the Ghaghara, which forms the western border of Nepal to India. The area is located on the territory of the physiographic region of Terai.

In the north, it borders on the Dadeldhur district, in the east on the Kailali district of the Seti zone, in the west on the Indian state of Uttarakhand and on the south on the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.  The population according to the 2011 census is 451,248 people (216,042 men and 235,206 women). According to the 2001 census, it numbered 377,899 people.

Most of the population is represented by people who have migrated here from the more northern mountainous regions. The indigenous people of these places – tharu, today is a minority of the population of the region.  About 80% of the population speak Kumaoni.  95.09% of the population are Hindu religion;  2.65% – Christianity;  1.15% is Buddhism;  0.10% is Islam. On the territory of the district is located Shuklaphant reserve.

  1. Kailali:

District Kailali is one of 77 districts in Nepal and has been part of the Sudurpashchim Province since the 2015 constitution. Kailali is located in the Terai in the west of the country on the border with India.  Through the north of the district runs a ridge of Siwaliks.

Along the northern and eastern borders run the rivers Thuligad and the lower reaches of the Karnali.  The right branch of the Karnali, the Kauriala, forms the southeastern district boundary.  The Mohana flows along the southern border. In the city of Dhangadhi, in the southwest of the district on the Indian border, is the administrative center.

Agriculture, including livestock and poultry farming, the food industry, and the service industries such as transportation, hotels, and commerce are the main economic sectors of the district.  Here are rice, wheat, vegetables, fruits, and potatoes are the main agricultural products.

The Kailali district and surrounding areas are considered to be the rice basket of the region and it has many large and well-known food processing companies.  The rich forest resources, about 64% of the area are covered with forest, in addition to the forestry also offer the potential for the collection and processing of herbs.

See Also: State Name List of Nepal

Name of 77 districts of Nepal

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Jitendra Sahayogee

I am Jitendra Sahayogee, a writer of 12 Nepali literature books, film director of Maithili film & Nepali short movies, photographer, founder of the media house, designer of some websites and writer & editor of some blogs, has expert knowledge & experiences of Nepalese society, culture, tourist places, travels, business, literature, movies, festivals, celebrations.

4 thoughts on “Name of 77 Districts of Nepal With Detail Information

  1. You’ve written 77 zones instead of districts in the fourth sentence of the description.It may create confusion to the reader so please correct it.

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